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Pathophysiology of Uterine Myomas and Its Clinical Implications

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Uterine Myoma, Myomectomy and Minimally Invasive Treatments

Abstract

Uterine leiomyomas or, as frequently called, fibroids or myomas, are the most common solid pelvic tumors of the genital tract in women. Because of their frequency and bothersome symptomatology, they represent an onerous condition for women that often need to be dealt with medically. The majority of symptomatic women may require surgical treatment, as most medical approaches available at present, have not been completely successful, particularly in the long term. The pathophysiology of these tumors needs to be carefully reviewed and understood by physicians caring for women afflicted with this condition, in order to provide the best therapeutic option. This chapter will summarize the important factors involved in the pathophysiology of these tumors.

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Correspondence to Rafael F. Valle MD .

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Valle, R.F., Ekpo, G.E. (2015). Pathophysiology of Uterine Myomas and Its Clinical Implications. In: Tinelli, A., Malvasi, A. (eds) Uterine Myoma, Myomectomy and Minimally Invasive Treatments. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-10305-1_1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-10305-1_1

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  • Publisher Name: Springer, Cham

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-319-10304-4

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-319-10305-1

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