Advertisement

The Goddess’s New Clothes. Conceptualising an ‘Eastern’ Goddess for a ‘Western’ Audience

  • Svenja NagelEmail author
Chapter
  • 593 Downloads
Part of the Transcultural Research – Heidelberg Studies on Asia and Europe in a Global Context book series (TRANSCULT)

Abstract

This paper deals with the cult of the Egyptian goddess Isis, which spread through all the provinces of the Roman Empire and has left us with a rich compound of archaeological remains. In this contribution I want to ask how a religious idea could be transferred by means of material culture and especially by means of iconography. With the help of some illustrative examples that represent some of the major problems in the methodology, different ways of ‘translating’ foreign concepts into an intelligible visual system for the recipients shall be revealed. The transfer of this religious entity was only possible if people had a certain image of the goddess and her cult in their minds, one that they could identify with, but that was still innovative and interesting enough to stimulate sufficient fascination to adapt the cult. Therefore, its pictorial conception, consisting of cult statues, mythological scenes, and other depictions of the deities, was of vital importance. How can we evaluate changes and developments within the iconography or determine the ancient viewer’s understanding of them? How are original Egyptian iconographic and stylistic elements dealt with? Very often such elements are put into a new context, combined with Hellenistic or Roman motifs and the overall visual tradition of these dominating cultures. While the references to the Eastern origins are visually obvious, we have to question their deeper meaning and its possible changes on their way into the West.

Keywords

Outer Appearance Roman World Isis Image Afterlife Belief Divine Image 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Albersmeier, Sabine. Untersuchungen zu den Frauenstatuen des ptolemäischen Ägypten. Aegyptiaca Treverensia 10. Mainz: von Zabern, 2002.Google Scholar
  2. Albersmeier, Sabine. “Das Isisgewand der Ptolemäerinnen. Herkunft, Form und Funktion.” In Fremdheit–Eigenheit. Ägypten, Griechenland und Rom. Austausch und Verständnis, edited by Peter C. Bol, Gabriele Kaminski, Caterina Maderna and Städel-Jahrbuch N. F. 19, 421–432. Stuttgart: Scheufele, 2004.Google Scholar
  3. Albersmeier, Sabine. “Griechisch-römische Bildnisse der Isis.” In Ägypten Griechenland Rom. Abwehr und Berührung, edited by Peter Beck, Peter C. Bol and Maraike Bückling, 310–314. Frankfurt: Liebighaus, 2005.Google Scholar
  4. Albersmeier, Sabine. “Die Statuen der Ptolemäerinnen. In Ägypten Griechenland Rom. Abwehr und Berührung, edited by Peter Beck, Peter C. Bol and Maraike Bückling, 252–257. Frankfurt: Liebighaus, 2005.Google Scholar
  5. Alfano, Carla. “L’Iseo Campense in Roma. Relazione preliminare sui nuovi ritrovamenti.” In L’Egitto in Italia: Dall‘antichità al medioevo. Atti del III Congresso Internazionale Italo-Egiziano, edited by Nicola Bonacasa, 177–206. Rome: Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, 1998.Google Scholar
  6. Altenmüller, Hartwig. “Die Apotropaia und die Götter Mittelägyptens: eine typologische und religionsgeschichtliche Untersuchung der sog. ‘Zaubermesser’ des Mittleren Reiches.” PhD diss., Munich University, 1964.Google Scholar
  7. Anthes, Rudolf. “Affinity and Difference between Egyptian and Greek Sculpture and Thought in the Seventh and Sixth Centuries B.C.” Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society held at Philadelphia for promoting useful knowledge 107, no. 1 (1963): 60–81.Google Scholar
  8. Apuleius. The Isis-book: Metamorphoses, Book XI. Translated and edited by John G. Griffiths. Études préliminaires aux religions orientales dans l’Empire romain 39. Leiden: Brill, 1975.Google Scholar
  9. Ashton, Sally A. Ptolemaic Royal Sculpture from Egypt: The Interaction between Greek and Egyptian Traditions. British Archaeological Reports: International series 923. Oxford: Archaeopress 2001.Google Scholar
  10. Beck, Peter, Peter C. Bol and Maraike Bückling. Ägypten Griechenland Rom. Abwehr und Berührung. Frankfurt: Liebighaus, 2005.Google Scholar
  11. Bérard, Claude. “Modes de formation et modes de lecture des images divines: Aphrodite et Isis à la voile.” In ΕΙΔΩΛΟΠΟΙΙΑ. Actes du colloque sur les problèmes de l’image dans le monde méditerranéen classique. Archeologica 61, 163–171. Rome: Bretschneider, 1985.Google Scholar
  12. Bergman, Jan. Isis-Seele und Osiris-Ei: Zwei ägyptologische Studien zu Diodorus Siculus I, 27, 4-5. Acta universitatis upsaliensis: Historia religionum 4. Uppsala 1970.Google Scholar
  13. Bergmann, Marianne. “Sarapis im 3. Jh. v. Chr.” In Alexandreia und das ptolemäische Ägypten: Kulturbegegnungen in hellenistischer Zeit, edited by Gregor Weber, 109–135. Berlin: Verlag Antike, 2010.Google Scholar
  14. Bianchi, Robert S. “Not the Isis Knot.” Bulletin of the Egyptological Seminar 2 (1980): 9–31.Google Scholar
  15. Bianchi, Robert S. “Images of Isis and her Cultic Shrines Reconsidered: Towards an Egyptian Understanding of the Interpretatio Graeca.” In Nile into Tiber: Egypt in the Roman World. Proceedings of the IIIrd International Conference of Isis Studies, edited by Laurent Bricault, Miguel J. Versluys and Paul G. P. Meyboom. Religions in the Graeco-Roman World 159, 470–505. Leiden: Brill, 2007.Google Scholar
  16. Bol, Peter C., Gabriele Kaminski and Caterina Maderna, eds. Fremdheit–Eigenheit. Ägypten, Griechenland und Rom. Austausch und Verständnis. Städel-Jahrbuch N. F. 19. Stuttgart: Scheufele, 2004.Google Scholar
  17. Bommas, Martin. “Situlae and the Offering of Water in the Divine Funerary Cult.” In L’acqua nell’Antico Egitto. Proceedings of the First International conference for Young Egyptologists, edited by Alessia Amenta, Maria M. Luiselli and Maria N. Sordi, 257–272. Rome: L’Erma di Bretschneider, 2005.Google Scholar
  18. Borgeaud, Philippe and Youri Volokhine. “La formation de la légende de Sarapis: une approche transculturelle.” Archiv für Religionsgeschichte 2 (2000): 62–72.Google Scholar
  19. Bothmer, Bernard V. “Hellenistic Elements in Egyptian Sculpture of the Ptolemaic Period.” In Alexandria and Alexandrianism. Papers Delivered at a Symposium Organized by The J. Paul Getty Museum and The Getty Center for the History of Art and the Humanities and Held at the Museum, edited by Kenneth Hamma, 215–230. Los Angeles, CA.: The J. Paul Getty Museum,1996.Google Scholar
  20. Braun, Nadja S. Pharao und Priester–sakrale Affirmation durch Kultvollzug. Das tägliche Kultbildritual im Neuen Reich und in der Dritten Zwischenzeit. Philippika 23. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 2008.Google Scholar
  21. Brenk, Frederick E. “The Isis Campensis of Katja Lembke.” In Imago Antiquitatis: Religions et iconographie dans le monde romain, Mélanges offerts à R. Turcan, edited by Nicole Blanc and André Buisson, 133–143. Paris: De Boccard, 1999.Google Scholar
  22. Brenk, Frederick E. “Osirian Reflections. Second Thoughts on the Iseum Campense at Rome.” In Hommages à Carl Deroux IV, edited by Pol Defisse. Collection Latomus 277, 291–301. Brussels: Éd. Latomus, 2003.Google Scholar
  23. Bricault, Laurent “Du nom des images d’Isis polymorphe.” In Religions orientales–Culti misterici. Neue Perspektiven, edited by Corinne Bonnet, Jörg Rüpke and Paolo Scarpi. Potsdamer altertumswissenschaftliche Beiträge 16, 75–95. Stuttgart: Steiner, 2006.Google Scholar
  24. Bricault, Laurent, ed. Sylloge Nummorum Religionis Isiacae et Sarapiacae (SNRIS). Mémoires de l’Académie des Inscriptions et Belles Lettres 38. Paris: De Boccard, 2008.Google Scholar
  25. Bricault, Laurent, Miguel J. Versluys and Paul G. P. Meyboom, eds. Nile into Tiber: Egypt in the Roman World. Proceedings of the IIIrd International Conference of Isis Studies. Religions in the Graeco-Roman World 159. Leiden: Brill, 2007.Google Scholar
  26. Broekhuis, Jan. De godin Renenwetet. Assen: van Gorcum, 1971.Google Scholar
  27. Brunelle, Edelgard. “Die Bildnisse der Ptolemäerinnen.” PhD diss., University of Frankfurt am Main, 1976.Google Scholar
  28. Budde, Dagmar. “‘Die den Himmel durchsticht und sich mit den Sternen vereint’: Zur Bedeutung und Funktion der Doppelfederkrone in der Götterikonographie.” Studien zur Altägyptischen Kultur 30 (2002): 57–102.Google Scholar
  29. de Caro, Stefano, ed. Alla ricerca di Iside: Analisi, studi, e restauri dell’Iseo pompeiano nel Museo di Napoli. Rome: Arti S.p.A., 1992.Google Scholar
  30. Caroli, Christian A. Ptolemaios I. Soter: Herrscher zweier Kulturen. Historia Orientis & Africae. Constance: Badawi Artes Afro Arabica, 2007.Google Scholar
  31. Charles-Gaffiot, Jacques, and H. Lavagne, eds. Hadrien: Trésors d’une villa impériale. Milan: Electa, 1999.Google Scholar
  32. Clerc, Gisèle. “Personnalité et iconographie d’Isis en Gaule d’après les témoignages de la déesse retrouvés en France.” In La vallée du Nil et la Mediterranée: Voies de communication et vecteurs culturels. Actes du Colloque des 5 et 6 juin 1998, Université Paul Valéry, edited by Sydney H. Aufrère. Orientalia Monspeliensia 12, 97–110. Montpellier: Univ. Paul Valéry, 2001.Google Scholar
  33. Clerc, Gisèle, and Jean Leclant, “Sarapis.” In Lexicon iconographicum mythologiae classicae (LIMC) VII, 1, edited by Hans C. Ackermann, 666–692. Düsseldorf: Artemis, 1994.Google Scholar
  34. Cumont, Franz. “Nouvelles découvertes à Cyrène: le temple d’Isis.” Journal des savants, n. s. 25 (1927): 318–322.Google Scholar
  35. Delia, Diana. “Isis, or the Moon.” In Egyptian Religion, the Last Thousand Years, Studies Dedicated to the Memory of Jan Quaegebeur I, Orientalia Lovaniensia analecta 84, edited by Willy Clarysse, Antoon Schoors and Harco Willems, 539–550. Leuven: Peeters, 1998.Google Scholar
  36. Deschênes, Gisèle. “Isis-Thermouthis: exemple d’un biculturalisme,” In Mélanges d’études anciennes offerts à Maurice Lebel, edited by Jean-Benoit Caron, 363–370. Québec City: Éd. du Sphinx, 1980.Google Scholar
  37. Dunand, Françoise. “Les réprésentations de l’Agathodémon à propos de quelques bas-reliefs du Musée d’Alexandrie.” Bulletin de l’Institut Français d’Archéologie Orientale 67 (1969): 9–48.Google Scholar
  38. Dunand, Françoise. Le culte d’Isis dans le Bassin Oriental de la Méditerranée I: Le culte d’Isis et les Ptolémées. Études préliminaires aux religions orientales dans l’Empire romain 26, 1. Leiden: Brill, 1973.Google Scholar
  39. Dunand, Françoise Religion populaire en Égypte Romaine: Les terres cuites isiaques du Musée du Caire. Études préliminaires aux religions orientales dans l’Empire romain 76. Leiden: Brill, 1979.Google Scholar
  40. Dunand, Françoise. “Syncrétrisme ou coexistence: images du religieux dans l’Égypte tardive.” In Les syncrétismes religieux dans le monde méditerranéen antique. Actes du Colloque International en l’honneur de Franz Cumont, edited by Corinne Bonnet and André Motte, 97–116. Rome: Brepols, 1999.Google Scholar
  41. ΕΙΔΩΛΟΠΟΙΙΑ Actes du colloque sur les problèmes de l’image dans le monde méditerranéen classique. Archeologica 61. Rome: Bretschneider, 1985.Google Scholar
  42. Eingartner, Johannes. Isis und ihre Dienerinnen in der Kunst der römischen Kaiserzeit. Supplements to Mnemosyne 115. Leiden: Brill, 1991.Google Scholar
  43. Ensoli Vittozzi, Serena. “Indagini sul culto di Iside a Cirene.” In L’Africa Romana IX, edited by Attilio Mastino. Pubblicazioni del Dipartimento di Storia dell’Università di Sassari 20, 167–250. Sassari: Gallizzi, 1992.Google Scholar
  44. Fischer, Jutta. Griechisch-römische Terrakotten aus Ägypten. Die Sammlungen Sieglin und Schreiber, Dresden, Leipzig, Stuttgart, Tübingen. Tübinger Studien zur Archäologie und Kunstgeschichte 14. Tübingen: Wasmuth, 1994.Google Scholar
  45. Fraser, Peter M. Ptolemaic Alexandria. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1972.Google Scholar
  46. Genaille, Nicole.“Le sistre Strozzi (à propos des objets cultuels isiaques en Italie).” Bulletin de la Société Française d’Egyptologie 77–78 (1976–1977): 55–67.Google Scholar
  47. Genaille, Nicole. “Sistrum, diffusion gréco-romaine.” In Lexikon der Ägyptologie V, edited by Wolfgang Helck and Wolfhart Westendorf, 963–965. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 1984.Google Scholar
  48. Genaille, Nicole. “Instruments du culte isiaque figurés sur trois monuments funéraires de Rome.” In Hommages à Jean Leclant III: Études isiaques, edited by Cathérine Berger-El Naggar, Gisèle Clerc and Nicolas Grimal. Bibliothèque d’étude 106, 3, 223–234. Cairo: Institut Français d'Archéologie Orientale, 1994.Google Scholar
  49. Ghislanzoni, Ettore. “Il santuario delle divinità alessandrine.” Notiziario Archeologico del Ministero delle Colonie 4 (1927): 149–206.Google Scholar
  50. La gloire d’Alexandrie. Une exposition des Musées de la Ville de Paris, 7 mai au 26 juillet 1998, Musée du Petit Palais. Paris: Paris-Musées, Association Française d’Action Artistique, 1998.Google Scholar
  51. Grenier, Jean-Claude. “La décoration statuaire du ‘Serapeum’ du ‘Canope’ de la Villa Adriana.” Mélanges de l’École Française de Rome: Antiquité 101 (1989): 925–1019.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  52. Grenier, Jean-Claude. L’Osiris Antinoos. Cahiers de l’Égypte Nilotique et Méditérranéenne 1. Montpellier: Université Paul Valery (Montpellier III), 2008.Google Scholar
  53. Grimm, Alfred, Dieter Kessler and Hugo Meyer. Der Obelisk des Antinoos: Eine kommentierte Edition. Munich: Fink, 1994.Google Scholar
  54. Guglielmi, Waltraud, and Knut Buroh. “Die Eingangssprüche des Täglichen Tempelrituals nach Papyrus Berlin 3055 (I, 1–VI, 3).” In Essays on Ancient Egypt in Honour of Herman te Velde, edited by Jacobus van Dijk. Egyptological Memoirs 1, 101–166. Groningen: STYX Publ., 1997.Google Scholar
  55. Hölscher, Tonio. The Language of Images in Roman Art. Translated by Anthony Snodgrass and Anne-Marie Künzl-Snodgrass. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004.Google Scholar
  56. Hoffmann, Peter. Der Isis-Tempel in Pompeji. Charybdis 7. Münster: Lit, 1993.Google Scholar
  57. Hornbostel, Wilhelm. Sarapis: Studien zur Überlieferungsgeschichte, den Erscheinungsformen und Wandlungen der Gestalt eines Gottes. Études préliminaires aux religions orientales dans l’Empire romain 32. Leiden: Brill, 1973.Google Scholar
  58. Hornung, Erik. Der Eine und die Vielen. 6th ed. Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, 2005.Google Scholar
  59. Huß, Werner. Der makedonische König und die ägyptischen Priester: Studien zur Geschichte des ptolemaiischen Ägypten. Stuttgart: Steiner, 1994.Google Scholar
  60. Hussy, Holger. Die Epiphanie und Erneuerung der Macht Gottes: Szenen des täglichen Kultbildrituals in den ägyptischen Tempeln der griechisch-römischen Epoche. Studien zu den Ritualszenen altägyptischer Tempel 5. Dettelbach: Röll, 2007.Google Scholar
  61. Junker, Herrmann. Das Götterdekret über das Abaton. Vienna: Hölder, 1913.Google Scholar
  62. Kamlah, Jens. “Zwei nordpalästinische ‘Heiligtümer’ der persischen Zeit und ihre epigraphischen Funde.” Zeitschrift des Deutschen Palästina-Vereins 115 (1999): 163–190.Google Scholar
  63. Karakasi, Katerina. Archaic Korai. Los Angeles: J. Paul Getty Museum, 2003.Google Scholar
  64. Kleibl, Kathrin. Iseion: Raumgestaltung und Kultpraxis in den Heiligtümern gräco-ägyptischer Götter im Mittelmeerraum. Worms: Werner, 2009.Google Scholar
  65. Krug, Antje. “Isis–Aphrodite–Astarte,” In: Fremdheit–Eigenheit. Ägypten, Griechenland und Rom. Austausch und Verständnis, edited by Peter C. Bol, Gabriele Kaminski and Caterina Maderna, Städel-Jahrbuch N. F. 19, 180–190. Stuttgart: Scheufele, 2004.Google Scholar
  66. Leclant, Jean. “Isis, déesse universelle et divinité locale dans le monde gréco-romaine.” In Iconographie classique et identités régionales, edited by Lilly Kahil, Christian Augé and Pascale Linant de Bellefonds. Bulletin de correspondance hellénique: Supplément 14, 341–352. Athens: École Française d’Athènes, 1986.Google Scholar
  67. Lichtheim, Miriam. “Oriental Museum Notes: Situla No. 11395 and Some Remarks on Egyptian Situlae.” Journal of Near Eastern Studies 6 (1947): 169–179.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  68. von Lieven, Alexandra. Grundriss des Laufes der Sterne. The Carlsberg Papyri 8. Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press, 2007.Google Scholar
  69. Malaise, Michel. Les conditions de pénétration et de diffusion des cultes égyptiens en Italie. Études préliminaires aux religions orientales dans l’Empire romain 22. Leiden: Brill, 1972.Google Scholar
  70. Malaise, Michel. “Problèmes soulevés par l’iconographie de Sérapis.” Latomus 34 (1975): 383–391.Google Scholar
  71. Malaise, Michel. “Histoire et signification de la coiffure hathorique à plumes.” Studien zur Altägyptischen Kultur 4 (1976): 215–236.Google Scholar
  72. Malaise, Michel. “À propos de l’iconographie ‘canonique’ d’Isis et des femmes vouées à son culte.” Kernos 5 (1992): 335–336.Google Scholar
  73. Malaise, Michel. “Notes sur le noeud isiaque.” Göttinger Miszellen 143 (1994): 105–108.Google Scholar
  74. Malaise, Michel Pour une terminologie et une analyse des cultes isiaques. Brussels: Classe des Lettres, Acad. Royale de Belgique, 2005.Google Scholar
  75. Malaise, Michel. “Le basileion, une couronne d’Isis: origine et signification.” In El Kab and Beyond, Studies in honour of Luc Limme, edited by Wouter Claes, Herman De Meulenaere and Stan Hendrickx. Orientalia Lovaniensia Analecta 191, 439–456. Leuven: Peeters, 2009.Google Scholar
  76. Merkelbach, Reinhold. Isis Regina–Zeus Sarapis: Die ägyptische Religion nach den Quellen dargestellt. 2nd. ed. Munich: Saur, 2001.Google Scholar
  77. Moret, Alexandre. Le Rituel du Culte divin journalier en Égypte. Paris: Leroux, 1902.Google Scholar
  78. Müller, Hans W. “Isis mit dem Horuskinde: Ein Beitrag zur Ikonographie der stillenden Gottesmutter im hellenistischen und römischen Ägypten.” Münchner Jahrbuch der Bildenden Kunst 14 (1963): 7–38.Google Scholar
  79. Müller, Hans W. Der Isiskult im antiken Benevent und Katalog der Skulpturen aus den ägyptischen Heiligtümern im Museo del Sannio. Münchner ägyptologische Studien 16. Berlin: Hessling, 1969.Google Scholar
  80. Münster, Maria. Untersuchungen zur Göttin Isis vom Alten Reich bis zum Ende des Neuen Reiches. Münchner ägyptologische Studien 11. Berlin: Hessling, 1968.Google Scholar
  81. Mylonopoulos, Joannis, ed. Divine images and human imaginations in ancient Greece and Rome. Religions in the Graeco-Roman World 170. Leiden: Brill, 2010.Google Scholar
  82. Myśliwiec, Karol. Studien zum Gott Atum 1: Die heiligen Tiere des Atum. Hildesheimer ägyptologische Beiträge 5. Hildesheim: Gerstenberg, 1978.Google Scholar
  83. Nachtergael, Georges. “La chevelure d’Isis.” L’Antiquité Classique 50 (1981): 584–605.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  84. Nagel, Svenja. “Isis und die Herrscher. Eine ägyptische Göttin als (Über-)Trägerin von Macht und Herrschaft für Pharaonen, Ptolemäer und Kaiser.” In Macht und Ohnmacht. Religiöse, soziale und ökonomische Spannungsfelder in frühen Gesellschaften, edited by Diamantis Panagiotopoulos and Maren Schentuleit Philippika. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, forthcoming.Google Scholar
  85. Nagel, Svenja. “Kult und Ritual der Isis zwischen Ägypten und Rom. Ein transkulturelles Phänomen.” In Rituale als Ausdruck von Kulturkontakt.Synkretismuszwischen Negation und Neudefinition. Akten der Interdisziplinären Tagung des Sonderforschungsbereiches “Ritualdynamik” in Heidelberg, 03–05 December 2010, edited by Claus Ambos, Robert Langer, Laetitia Martzolff and Andreas Pries. Studies in Oriental Religions 67, 151–176. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 2013.Google Scholar
  86. Nagel, Svenja. “The Cult of Isis and Sarapis in North Africa. Local Shifts of an Egyptian Cult under the Influence of Different Cultural Traditions.” In Egyptian Gods in the Hellenistic and Roman Mediterranean. Image and Reality between Local and Global. Proceedings of the IInd International PhD Workshop on Isis Studies, Leiden University, January 26–2011, edited by Laurent Bricault and Miguel John Versluys. Supplemento a Mythos 3, 67–92. Caltanissetta: Sciascia, 2012.Google Scholar
  87. Paarmann, Bjørn. “The Ptolemaic Sarapis-cult and its founding myths.” In Aneignung und Abgrenzung. Wechselnde Perspektiven auf die Antithese von ‘Ost’ und ‘West’ in der griechischen Antike, edited by Nicolas Zenzen, T. Hölscher and Kai Trampedach. Oikumene 10, 255–291. Heidelberg: Verlag Antike, 2013.Google Scholar
  88. Pachis, Panayotis. “‘Manufacturing Religion’ in the Hellenistic Age: The Case of Isis-Demeter Cult.” In Hellenisation, Empire and Globalisation: Lessons from Antiquity. Acts of the Panel held during the 3rd Congress of the European Association for the Study of Religion, edited by Luther H. Martin and Panayotis Pachis, 163–208. Thessaloniki: Ekdoseis Vanias, 2004.Google Scholar
  89. Pérez Arroyo, Rafael. Egypt: Music in the Age of the Pyramids. Madrid: Ed. Centro de Estudios Egipcios, 2003.Google Scholar
  90. Pfeiffer, Stefan. “The God Serapis, his Cult and the Beginnings of the Ruler Cult in Ptolemaic Egypt.” In Ptolemy II Philadelphus and his World, edited by Paul McKechnie and Philippe Guillaume. Mnemosyne Supplements 300, 387–408. Leiden: Brill, 2008.Google Scholar
  91. Plutarchus. De Iside et Osiride. Translated and edited by John G. Griffiths. Cardiff: Univ. of Wales Press, 1970.Google Scholar
  92. Quack, Joachim F. “Zum ägyptischen Kult im Iseum Campense in Rom.” In Rituale in der Vorgeschichte, Antike und Gegenwart. Studien zur Vorderasiatischen, Prähistorischen und Klassischen Archäologie, Ägyptologie, Alten Geschichte, Theologie und Religionswissenschaft. Interdisziplinäre Tagung vom 1–2 Februar 2002 an der FU Berlin, edited by Carola Metzner-Nebelsick, 57–66. Rahden, Westfalen: Leidorf, 2003.Google Scholar
  93. Quack, Joachim F. “Resting in pieces and integrating the Oikoumene. On the mental expansion of the religious landscape by means of the body parts of Osiris.” In Religious Flows in the Ancient World–The Diffusion of the Cults of Isis, Mithras and Iuppiter Dolichenus within the Imperium Romanum. Conference Proceedings, edited by Joachim F. Quack, Christian Witschel, Darius Frackowiak and Svenja Nagel. Oriental Religions in Antiquity. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, forthcoming.Google Scholar
  94. Quack, Joachim F. “Sarapis: Ein Gott zwischen ägyptischer und griechischer Religion. Bemerkungen aus der Sicht eines Ägyptologen.” In Aneignung und Abgrenzung. Wechselnde Perspektiven auf die Antithese von ‘Ost’ und ‘West’ in der griechischen Antike, edited by Nicolas Zenzen, T. Hölscher and Kai Trampedach. Oikumene 10, 229–255. Heidelberg: Verlag Antike, 2013.Google Scholar
  95. Quack, Joachim F., Christian Witschel, Darius Frackowiak and Svenja Nagel, eds. Religious Flows in the Ancient World–The Diffusion of the Cults of Isis, Mithras and Iuppiter Dolichenus within the Imperium Romanum. Conference Proceedings. Oriental Religions in Antiquity. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, forthcoming.Google Scholar
  96. Quaegebeur, Jan, and Claire Evrard-Derricks. “La situle décorée de Nesnakhetiou au Musée Royal de Mariemont.” Chronique d’Egypte 54 (1979): 26–56.Google Scholar
  97. Richter, Gisela M. A. Korai, Archaic Greek Maidens. A Study of the Development of the Kore Type in Greek Sculpture. London: Phaidon, 1968.Google Scholar
  98. Richter, Gisela M. “Kouroi and Korai.” Das Altertum 17 (1971): 11–24.Google Scholar
  99. Roullet, Anne. The Egyptian and Egyptianizing Monuments of Imperial Rome. Études préliminaires aux religions orientales dans l’Empire romain 20. Leiden: Brill, 1972.Google Scholar
  100. Schmidt, Ernst. Kultübertragungen. Religionsgeschichtliche Versuche und Vorarbeiten 8, 2. Gießen: Töpelmann, 1909.Google Scholar
  101. Schmidt, Stefan. “Serapis–Ein neuer Gott für die Griechen in Ägypten.” In Ägypten Griechenland Rom. Abwehr und Berührung, edited by Peter Beck, Peter C. Bol and Maraike Bückling, 291–304. Frankfurt: Liebighaus, 2005.Google Scholar
  102. Schulz, Regine. “Warum Isis? Gedanken zum universellen Charakter einer ägyptischen Göttin im Römischen Reich.” In Ägypten und der östliche Mittelmeerraum im 1. Jahrtausend v. Chr. Akten des Interdisziplinären Symposions am Institut für Ägyptologie der Universität München 25–27 October 1996, edited by Manfred Görg and Günther Hölbl. Ägypten und Altes Testament 44, 251–280. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 2000.Google Scholar
  103. Schwentzel, Christian G. “Les boucles d’Isis. ΙΣΙΔΟΣ ΠΛΟΚΑΜΟΙ.” In De Memphis à Rome. Actes du Ier Colloque International sur les Études Isiaques, edited by Laurent Bricault. Religions in the Graeco-Roman World 140, 21–33. Leiden: Brill, 2000.Google Scholar
  104. Sternberg-El Hotabi, Heike. Untersuchungen zur Überlieferungsgeschichte der Horusstelen: Ein Beitrag zur Religionsgeschichte Ägyptens im 1. Jahrtausend v. Chr. Ägyptologische Abhandlungen 62. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 1999.Google Scholar
  105. Steuernagel, Dirk. Kult und Alltag in römischen Hafenstädten. Potsdamer Altertumswissenschaftliche Beiträge 11. Stuttgart: Franz Steiner Verlag, 2004.Google Scholar
  106. Swetnam-Burland, Maria R. “Egypt in the Roman Imagination: A Study of Aegyptiaca from Pompeii.” PhD diss., University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 2002.Google Scholar
  107. Swetnam-Burland, Maria R. “Egyptian objects, Roman contexts: a taste for Aegyptiaca in Italy.” In Nile into Tiber: Egypt in the Roman World. Proceedings of the IIIrd International Conference of Isis Studies, edited by Laurent Bricault, Miguel J. Versluys and Paul G. P. Meyboom. Religions in the Graeco-Roman World 159, 113–136. Leiden: Brill, 2007.Google Scholar
  108. Tobin, Vincent A. “Isis and Demeter: Symbols of Divine Motherhood.” Journal of the American Research Center in Egypt 28 (1991): 187–200.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  109. Tran Tam Tinh, Vincent. Essai sur le culte d’Isis à Pompéi. Paris: Boccard, 1964.Google Scholar
  110. Tran Tam Tinh, Vincent. “Etat des études iconographiques relatives à Isis, Sérapis et Sunnaoi Theoi.” In Aufstieg und Niedergang der römischen Welt II, 17, 3, edited by Hildegard Temporini and Wolfgang Haase, 1710–1738. Berlin: De Gruyter, 1984.Google Scholar
  111. Tran Tam Tinh, Vincent. “Isis.” In Lexicon iconographicum mythologiae classicae (LIMC) V, 1, edited by Hans C. Ackermann, 761–796. Düsseldorf: Artemis, 1994.Google Scholar
  112. Turcan, Robert. “Trois ‘rébus’ de l’iconographie romaine ou les pièges de l’analogie.” In ΕΙΔΩΛΟΠΟΙΙΑ. Actes du colloque sur les problèmes de l’image dans le monde méditerranéen classique. Archeologica 61, 61–76. Rome: Bretschneider, 1985.Google Scholar
  113. Versluys, Miguel J. “The Sanctuary of Isis on the Campus Martius in Rome.” Bulletin antieke beschaving: Annual Papers on Classical Archaeology 72 (1997): 159–169.Google Scholar
  114. Versluys, Miguel J. Aegyptiaca Romana: Nilotic Scenes and the Roman Views of Egypt. Religions in the Graeco-Roman World 144. Leiden: Brill, 2002.Google Scholar
  115. Versluys, Miguel J. “Egypt as part of the Roman koine: a study in mnemohistory.” In Religious Flows in the Ancient World–The Diffusion of the Cults of Isis, Mithras and Iuppiter Dolichenus within the Imperium Romanum. Conference Proceedings, edited by Joachim F. Quack, Christian Witschel, Darius Frackowiak and Svenja Nagel. Oriental Religions in Antiquity. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, forthcoming.Google Scholar
  116. Wahlberg, Nina M. “Goddess Cults in Egypt between 1070 BC and 332 BC.” PhD diss., University of Birmingham, 2002.Google Scholar
  117. Walters, Elizabeth J. Attic Grave Reliefs that Represent Women in the Dress of Isis. Hesperia: Suppl. 22. Princeton, N. J.: American School of Classical Studies at Athens, 1988.Google Scholar
  118. Willems, Harco. The Coffin of Heqata (Cairo JdE 36418): A Case Study of Egyptian Funerary Culture of the Early Middle Kingdom. Orientalia Lovaniensia analecta 70. Leuven: Peeters, 1996.Google Scholar
  119. Ziegler, Christiane. “Sistrum.” In Lexikon der Ägyptologie V, edited by Wolfgang Helck and Wolfhart Westendorf, 959–963. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 1984.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The Cluster of Excellence ‘Asia and Europe in a Global Context’Heidelberg UniversityHeidelbergGermany

Personalised recommendations