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‘Cultural Citizenship’ and Media Representation in India: Towards a Trans-Policy Approach

  • Lion KönigEmail author
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Part of the Transcultural Research – Heidelberg Studies on Asia and Europe in a Global Context book series (TRANSCULT)

Abstract

Using India as a case study, this chapter focuses on the significance of cultural participation for the inclusivity of society and following from that for the legitimacy of the state. A sketch of the development of citizenship theory is followed by a discussion of the conceptual novelty of ‘cultural citizenship,’ which serves as the theoretical base for conceptualising the inclusive nature of a society in the deeply-divided, multi-discursive setting of post-colonial India. Situated at the axis of the political and the media sphere, cultural citizenship is understood as a cycle of the cultural production of meaning. In this understanding, cultural citizenship opens up a discursive space in which meanings circulate and are negotiated. Media representation is thus linked to governance, and the engagement of the public in these processes can contribute to an increased sense of belonging to the national community. The role that the ever-growing media sphere in India plays in the representation and identity-articulation of various communities is explored by means of a content analysis of selected television channels and leading newspapers. In addition, archival research and expert interviews constitute the main components of this study of the inclusivity and permeability of the Indian mass media. The chapter arrives at the conclusion that the Indian case could benefit from a ‘trans-policy approach,’ which takes into consideration ideas and role models that have been applied successfully in other countries.

Keywords

Television News News Coverage Mainstream Medium Television Channel Participatory Democracy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The Cluster of Excellence ‘Asia and Europe in a Global Context’Heidelberg UniversityHeidelbergGermany

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