Advertisement

The Energy Efficiency Benefits and the Economic Imperative of ICT-Enabled Systems

Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 310)

Abstract

The global economy is not particularly energy-efficient. At current levels of consumption, we now waste about 86 % of the energy now used to maintain economic activity. This magnitude of waste imposes huge costs that constrain the robustness of the world economy. At the same time, however, there is an array of untapped cost-effective energy efficiency resources that can restore both energy and economic efficiency. Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) may be the key to unlocking that potential.

Keywords

Information and communication technologies Energy efficiency Energy productivity 

References

  1. 1.
    Emerson, R.W.: The American scholar. In: Nature Addresses and Lectures, vol. 1, pp. 81–84. Wm. H. Wise 1923, New York (1837)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Laitner, J.A.S.: Linking energy efficiency to economic productivity: recommendations for improving the robustness of the U.S. economy. ACEEE Report E13F. American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, Washington, D.C.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Ayres, R.U., Warr, B.S.: The Economic Growth Engine: How Energy and Work Drive Material Prosperity. Edward Elgar Publishing, Cheltenham (2009)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    EIA: United States Energy Information Administration: International Energy Statistics. U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, D.C. (2013) http://www.eia.gov/cfapps/ipdbproject/iedindex3.cfm. Accessed 31 May 2014
  5. 5.
    International Energy Agency: Energy Efficiency Market Report. OECD/IEA, Paris (2013)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    International Energy Agency: World Energy Outlook. OECD/IEA, Paris (2012)Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Lazard Asset Management: Lazard’s Levelized Cost of Energy Analysis: Version 7.0. Lazard, Ltd, New York (2013)Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Elliott, R.N., Gold, R., Hayes, S.: Avoiding a Train Wreck: Replacing Old Coal Plants with Energy Efficiency. American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, Washington, D.C. (2011)Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    McKinsey & Company: The Case for Investing in Energy Productivity (2008). http://www.mckinsey.com/insights/energy_resources_materials/the_case_for_investing_in_energy_productivity. Accessed 31 May 2014
  10. 10.
    McKinsey & Company: Unlocking Energy Efficiency in the U.S. Economy. McKinsey & Company (2009) http://www.mckinsey.com/client_service/electric_power_and_natural_gas/latest_thinking/unlocking_energy_efficiency_in_the_us_economy. Accessed 31 May 2014
  11. 11.
    Cleetus, R., Clemmer, S., Friedman, D.: Climate 2030: A National Blueprint for a Clean Energy Economy. Union of Concerned Scientists, Cambridge (2009)Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Laitner, J.A.S., Nadel, S., Elliott, N., Sachs, H., Khan, S.: The Long-term Energy Efficiency Potential: What the Evidence Suggests. American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE), Washington, D.C. (2012)Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Economics, Copenhagen: Multiple Benefits of Investing in Energy Efficient Renovation of Buildings, Brussels. Renovate Europe, Belgium (2012)Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Rifkin, J., Prunel, B., Bastie, S., Hinterman, F., Laitner, J.A.S., Moorhead, S.: Nord-Pas de Calais Third Industrial Revolution Master Plan—2013. Foundation on Economic Trends, Bethesda (2013)Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Worrell, E., Laitner, J.A.S., Ruth, M., Finman, H.: Productivity benefits of industrial energy efficiency measures. Energy 28, 1081–1098 (2003)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Lung, R.B., McKane, A., Leach, R., Marsh, D.: Ancillary benefits and production benefits in the evaluation of industrial energy efficiency measures. In: Proceedings of the 2005 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry. American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, ACEEE, Washington D.C. (2005)Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Amann, J.: Valuation of Non-energy benefits to determine cost-effectiveness of whole-house retrofit programs, Report No. AO61. American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, ACEEE, Washington, D.C (2006)Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Cisco: VNI Forecast Highlights, Cisco Systems, San Jose, CA (2014) http://www.cisco.com/web/solutions/sp/vni/vni_forecast_highlights/index.html. Accessed 31 May 2014
  19. 19.
    Coroama, V.C., Hilty, L.M.: Assessing Internet energy intensity: a review of methods and results. Environ. Impact Assess. Rev. 45, 63–68 (2014)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    Coroama, V.C., Schien, D., Preist, C., Hilty, L.M.: The energy intensity of the Internet: home and access networks. In: Hilty, L.M., Aebischer, B. (eds.) ICT Innovations for Sustainability. Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing, vol. 310, pp. 137−155. Springer, Switzerland (2015)Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Schien, D., Coroama, V.C., Hilty, L.M., Preist, C.: The energy intensity of the Internet: edge and core networks. In: Hilty, L.M., Aebischer, B. (eds.) ICT Innovations for Sustainability. Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing, vol. 310, pp. 157–170. Springer, Switzerland (2015)Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Laitner, J.A.S., McDonnell, M.T., Ehrhardt-Martinez, K.: The Energy Efficiency and Productivity Benefits of Smart Appliances and ICT-Enabled Networks: An Initial Assessment. American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, ACEEE, Washington, D.C. (2014, forthcoming)Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    Laitner, J.A.S., Partridge, B., Vittore, V.: Measuring the energy reduction impact of selected broadband-enabled activities within households. ACEEE Report E128. American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, Washington, D.C. (2012)Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    GeSI: Smart 2020: Enabling the low carbon economy in the information age. Global e-Sustainability Initiative, Brussels (2008)Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    GeSI: SMARTer 2020: The Role of ICT in Driving a Sustainable Future. Global e-Sustainability Initiative, Belgium (2012)Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    Ehrhardt-Martinez, K., Donnelly, K., Laitner, J.A.S.: Advanced metering initiatives and residential feedback programs: a meta-review for household electricity-saving opportunities. ACEEE Research Report E105, American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, Washington, D.C. (2010)Google Scholar
  27. 27.
    Huber, M.Z., Hilty, L.M.: Gamification and sustainable consumption: overcoming the limitations of persuasive technologies. In: Hilty, L.M., Aebischer, B. (eds.) ICT Innovations for Sustainability. Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing, vol. 310, pp. 367–385. Springer, Switzerland (2015)Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    Laitner, J.A.S.: Semiconductors and information technologies: the power of productivity. J. Ind. Ecol. 14(5), 692–695 (2010)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. 29.
    California Air Resources Board, Market Advisory Committee: Recommendations for designing a greenhouse gas cap-and-trade system for California, (2007). http://www.energy.ca.gov/2007publications/ARB-1000-2007-007/ARB-1000-2007-007.PDF. Accessed 31 May 2014
  30. 30.
    Murtishaw, S., Sathaye, J.: Quantifying the effect of the principal-agent problem on U.S. Residential Energy Use, Rep. No.LBNL-59773. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, LBNL, Berkeley (2006)Google Scholar
  31. 31.
    Levinson, A., Niemann, S.: Energy use by tenants when landlords pay for utilities. Resour. Energy Econ. 26(1), 51–75 (2004)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. 32.
    Levine, M.D., Koomey, J.G., McMahon, J.E., Sanstad, A.H., Hirst, E.: Energy efficiency policy and market failures. Annu. Rev. Energy Env. 20, 535–555 (1995)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. 33.
    Brown, M.A.: Market failures and barriers as a basis for clean energy policies. Energy Policy 29(14), 1197–1207 (2004)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. 34.
    Geller, H.S., Harrington, P., Arthur, H., Satoshi Tanishima, R., Unander, F.: Policies for increasing energy efficiency: Thirty years of experience in OECD countries. Energy Policy 34, 556–573 (2006)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. 35.
    Brown, M.A., Chandler, J., Lapsa, M.V., Ally, M.: Making homes part of the climate solution: policy options to promote energy efficiency, Report No. ORNL/TM-2009/104. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, ORNL, Oak Ridge (2009)Google Scholar
  36. 36.
    Hanson, D.A., Laitner, J.A.S.: An integrated analysis of policies that increase investments in advanced energy-efficient/low-carbon technologies. Energy Econ. 26, 739–755 (2004)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. 37.
    Gossart, C.: Rebound effects and ICT: a review of the literature. In: Hilty, L.M., Aebischer, B. (eds.) ICT Innovations for Sustainability. Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing, vol. 310, pp. 435–448. Springer, Switzerland (2015)Google Scholar
  38. 38.
    Ehrhardt-Martinez, K., Laitner, J.A.: Rebound, technology and people: mitigating the rebound effect with energy-resource management and people-centered initiatives. In: Proceedings of the 2010 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, Washington, D.C. (2010)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Economic and Human Dimensions Research AssociatesTucsonUSA

Personalised recommendations