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A Finite Element Implementation in Three Dimensions

  • Tarek I. ZohdiEmail author
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Applied Sciences and Technology book series (BRIEFSAPPLSCIENCES)

Abstract

Generally, the ability to change the boundary data quickly is very important in finite element computations. One approach to do this rapidly is via the variational penalty method.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA

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