Information Privacy Concerns in Electronic Medical Records: A Preliminary Investigation

Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Business Information Processing book series (LNBIP, volume 185)

Abstract

Due to the growing development and integration of technology in healthcare domain, the amount of electronic medical records (EMR) denoting as big data characteristic are being collected by healthcare organizations have increased. Previous researches agreed that if the record is related with medical information, there is a need to ensure the privacy of these information. To address these concerns, it must be ensured that EMR are collected and communicated securely, accessed only by authorized parties and are not being disclosed to unauthorized parties when disseminated. In Malaysia, healthcare organizations need to ensure the privacy of EMR in compliance of Personal Data Protection Act (PDPA) 2010. This preliminary study is aimed to explore and understand the influencing factors of information privacy concerns in EMR. Seven (7) respondents were individually interviewed to explore the influencing factors they had experienced. This paper highlights six (6) constructs that emerged based on the research questions derived from the in-depth interviews. The findings of this on-going study proceed with designing a conceptual model.

Keywords

Privacy concerns Healthcare environment Big data Electronic medical records 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This study is funded by Zamalah Scholarship provided by Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM).

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Advanced Informatics School (AIS)Universiti Teknologi MalaysiaKuala LumpurMalaysia

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