International Conference on Computers for Handicapped Persons

ICCHP 2014: Computers Helping People with Special Needs pp 77-84 | Cite as

Patterns of Blind Users’ Hand Movements

The Case of Typographic Signals of Documents Rendered by Eight-Dot and Six-Dot Braille Code
  • Vassilios Argyropoulos
  • Georgios Kouroupetroglou
  • Aineias Martos
  • Magda Nikolaraizi
  • Sofia Chamonikolaou
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8547)

Abstract

The main focus of the present study lies on patterns and characteristics of hand movements when participants with blindness receive typographic meta-data (bold and italic) by touch through a braille display. Patterns and characteristics were investigated by the use of six-dot braille and eight-dot braille code in conjunction with types of reading errors. The results depicted that the participants’ reading errors (phonological type) were similar in both braille codes. In addition, the participants performed more fluid hand movements when they used the six-dot braille code, whereas they spent less time when they were reading through eight-dot braille. The focus of the discussion was placed on the importance of the development of a suitable design of tactile rendition of typographic signals through six or eight-dot braille code in favor of better perception and comprehension.

Keywords

Typographic Signals 6-dot Braille 8-dot Braille Braille Display Blindness Patterns of Hand Movements Reading Errors 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vassilios Argyropoulos
    • 1
  • Georgios Kouroupetroglou
    • 2
  • Aineias Martos
    • 1
    • 2
  • Magda Nikolaraizi
    • 1
  • Sofia Chamonikolaou
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Special EducationUniversity of ThessalyVolosGreece
  2. 2.Department of Informatics and TelecommunicationsNational and Kapodistrian University of AthensAthensGreece

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