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Introduction

  • Chongbin ZhaoEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Lecture Notes in Earth System Sciences book series (LNESS)

Abstract

Instability of nonlinear systems is a common phenomenon in nature. This phenomenon is the direct consequence of a nonlinear system when it reaches a qualitative change state (i.e. an unstable state) from a quantitative change state (i.e. a stable state). If a nonlinear system is in a stable state, then any small perturbation applied to the system does not cause any change in the basic characteristic of the dynamic response of the system. However, if a nonlinear system is in an unstable state, then any small perturbation applied to the system can cause a qualitative change in the basic characteristic of the dynamic response of the system. For this reason, the study of nonlinear system instability has become an important topic in many scientific and engineering fields over the past few decades.

Keywords

Porous Medium Chemical Dissolution Thermodynamic Instability Dissolution Front Dissolution System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Computational Geosciences Research CentreCentral South UniversityChangshaChina

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