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Popular Astronomy and the Solar Eclipses of 1868, 1869 and 1878

  • Stella Cottam
  • Wayne Orchiston
Chapter
Part of the Astrophysics and Space Science Library book series (ASSL, volume 406)

Abstract

Though numerous solar eclipses had been studied and documented in previous centuries, it was not until the middle of the nineteenth century that the tools of photography and spectroscopy became available, enabling scientists to make more of these rare and brief events. In 1860 documentation of an eclipse was made by photography. During the eclipse of 18 August 1868 spectroscopy was first used to determine more about the nature of the solar corona, during an eclipse that attained totality of almost 7 min duration at some sites.

Keywords

Solar Corona Solar Eclipse Bright Line Total Solar Eclipse Solar Prominence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stella Cottam
    • 1
  • Wayne Orchiston
    • 1
  1. 1.National Astronomical Research Institute of ThailandChiang MaiThailand

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