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Scientific Overview

  • Stella Cottam
  • Wayne Orchiston
Chapter
Part of the Astrophysics and Space Science Library book series (ASSL, volume 406)

Abstract

A solar eclipse occurs when the path of the Moon, as seen from the Earth, crosses that of the Sun. In the case of a total solar eclipse the lunar disc completely covers the Sun. Only in this circumstance will the corona, the outermost region of the solar atmosphere, become visible. It is also only during such an eclipse that the smaller ‘prominences’ (sometimes called ‘protuberances’), the red “… masses of great tenuity held in suspension …” (Carrington 1858, p. 177), will be seen, extending beyond the limb of the Moon. The source and nature of the corona and prominences were a topic of intense debate for many years.

Keywords

Solar Corona Solar Eclipse Astronomical Unit Total Solar Eclipse Solar Prominence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stella Cottam
    • 1
  • Wayne Orchiston
    • 1
  1. 1.National Astronomical Research Institute of ThailandChiang MaiThailand

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