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Consequences and complications

  • Angelo RavelliEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Systemic arthritis has a variable course [1–3]. In about half of patients, the disease is characterized by a monocyclic or an intermittent course with relapses followed by periods of remission. In such cases, arthritis accompanies episodes of fever but remits when systemic features are controlled. The long-term outlook for these patients is usually good. In the other half of patients, the disease follows an unremitting course. In many cases, but not all, extra-articular manifestations eventually subside and chronic arthritis remains as the major long-term problem.

Keywords

Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis Pediatric Rheumatology Macrophage Activation Syndrome Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Giannina Gaslini InstituteUniversity of GenovaGenoaItaly

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