Personal Information Management Competences: A Case Study of Future College Students

  • Jerry Jacques
  • Pierre Fastrez
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8521)

Abstract

The research project presented in this paper aims at modeling the media literacy competences required to organize and manage collections of information in the form of personal and shared digital environments. In-depth in situ interviews were conducted with future college students (N=11). During the interviews, the informants gave a guided tour of their personal space of information, and demonstrated how they used different digital tools to organize it. We identify three dimensions of personal information management (PIM) competence, based on the analysis of the way our informants describe their PIM practices by referring to and articulating (1) the constraints and affordances of the tools and devices they use, (2) the activities these tools and devices support, (3) the costs and benefits of these practices for these activities, and (4) their tastes and preferences towards them.

Keywords

personal information management media literacy information overload user empowerment 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jerry Jacques
    • 1
  • Pierre Fastrez
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Research in CommunicationUniversité Catholique de LouvainBelgium

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