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The Classification Tendency and Common Denomination of the Points Paid Attention in Ikebana Instruction

  • Yuki Ikenobo
  • Noriaki Kuwahara
  • Noriyuki Kida
  • Yuka Takai
  • Akihiko Goto
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8529)

Abstract

“Ikebana” is one of the representative aspects of Japanese Culture. However Ikebana arranging skill has been passed down as an oral tradition from master to disciple, rather than in a systematic educational system. This research examines the words used by a teacher with regard to ikebana arrangements created by a beginner and an experienced arranger, examines what parts of the arrangements are focused on and evaluated, and looks at the points ikebana teacher pay attention to in correcting arrangements. It is possible that clarifying the criteria for evaluation and correction of arrangements will contribute to establishing a logical and scientific method of teaching ikebana in the future.

With respect to the arrangement created by a beginner, there were many comments about the “tai” portion rather than evaluation of the overall form of the arrangement. So “tai” is supposed to be a difficult part of Ikebana arrangement for beginner. Regarding the arrangement created by the experienced arranger, it is possible that overall balance of the arrangement made the viewer have a positive impression of the whole work. However, a few positive comments were also made about the overall arrangement created by the beginner. Although the beginner’s arrangement was not as accomplished as the work by an experienced arranger, it appears that viewers don’t always look negatively at an arrangement created by a beginner. Next concerning correction of the arrangement, Comments for correction of Ikebana arrangement occurred both for beginner and for experienced arranger, though experienced arrangers followed the standard method. These results indicate that comments made during the correction of an arrangement can be categorized into two types: “comments made because of discrepancy with the one standard arranging method,” and “comments made because of disagreement with the aesthetics of the viewer.” The former type of comment occurs only for the arrangement made by a beginner, as opposed to many positive comments for the arrangement made by an experienced arranger. The latter type of comment seems to be made for arrangements both by an experienced arranger and a beginner.

Keywords

Correction arrangements comments aesthetic evaluation standard method 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yuki Ikenobo
    • 1
  • Noriaki Kuwahara
    • 1
  • Noriyuki Kida
    • 2
  • Yuka Takai
    • 3
  • Akihiko Goto
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Advanced Fibro Science, Graduate School of Science and TechnologyKyoto Institute of TechnologyKyotoJapan
  2. 2.Department of Applied Biology, Graduate School of Science and TechnologyKyoto Institute of TechnologyKyotoJapan
  3. 3.Department of Information Systems Engineering, Faculty of Design TechnologyOsaka Sangyo UniversityOsakaJapan

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