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The Design and Development of Empathetic Serious Games for Dyslexia: BCI Arabic Phonological Processing Training Systems

  • Arwa Al-Rubaian
  • Lama Alssum
  • Rawan Alharbi
  • Wafa Alrajhi
  • Haifa Aldayel
  • Nora Alangari
  • Hadeel Al-Negheimish
  • Aljohara Alfayez
  • Sara Alwaalan
  • Rania Aljindan
  • Ashwag Alshathri
  • Dania Alomar
  • Ghada Alhudhud
  • Areej Al-Wabil
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8520)

Abstract

In this paper, we describe the User Interface (UI) design issues for serious games aimed at developing phonological processing skills of people with specific learning difficulties such as dyslexia. These games are designed with Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI) which take the compelling and creative aspects of traditional computer games designed for Arabic interfaces and apply them for cognitive skills’ development purposes. Immersion and engagement in the games are sought with novel interaction methods; the interaction mode for these games involved mind-control coupled with cursor-based selection. We describe the conceptual design of these serious games and an overview of the BCI software development framework.

Keywords

Brain-Machine Interface BMI SpLD Learning Difficulty Dyslexia Brain-Computer Interface BCI Usability 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arwa Al-Rubaian
    • 1
  • Lama Alssum
    • 1
  • Rawan Alharbi
    • 1
  • Wafa Alrajhi
    • 1
  • Haifa Aldayel
    • 1
  • Nora Alangari
    • 1
  • Hadeel Al-Negheimish
    • 1
  • Aljohara Alfayez
    • 1
  • Sara Alwaalan
    • 1
  • Rania Aljindan
    • 1
  • Ashwag Alshathri
    • 1
  • Dania Alomar
    • 1
  • Ghada Alhudhud
    • 1
  • Areej Al-Wabil
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Software and Knowledge Engineering Research GroupKing Saud UniversityRiyadhSaudi Arabia
  2. 2.Software Engineering Department, College of Computer and Information SciencesKing Saud UniversityRiyadhSaudi Arabia

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