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Investigating Sustainability Stages in the Workplace

  • Ray Yun
  • Peter Scupelli
  • Azizan Aziz
  • Bertrand Lasternas
  • Vivian Loftness
  • Nana Wilberforce
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8519)

Abstract

Prior research on stage-based, behavior-change models investigated intervention effectiveness for stress management, smoking cessation, weight management, adherence to lipid-lowering drugs and the like. Few sustainability centered studies identify people’s stage-based levels for energy use reduction or sustainability. In this paper, we investigate sustainability stages with measured behavior and eco-awareness scores based on Geller’s behavior change model. Eighty office employees were assigned to one of four experimental energy dashboard conditions: (a) no energy dashboard; (b) feedback only; (c) feedback and manual on/off controls; and (d) feedback, manual on/off controls, and on/off calendaring. We measured with pre-post surveys change in sustainability levels, energy efficiency discussions frequency, and organizational efforts to understand the work environment. We found that the dashboard with feedback, controls, and on/off calendaring were significantly associated with reported greater energy saving behavior compared to no energy dashboards, and dashboards with fewer features (i.e., feedback only; feedback and on/off control).

Keywords

behavior change stages sustainability energy dashboard persuasive system workplace organization 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ray Yun
    • 1
  • Peter Scupelli
    • 3
  • Azizan Aziz
    • 2
  • Bertrand Lasternas
    • 2
  • Vivian Loftness
    • 2
  • Nana Wilberforce
    • 4
  1. 1.Computational Design, School of ArchitectureCarnegie Mellon UniversityPittsburghUnited States
  2. 2.Building Performance and Diagnostics, School of ArchitectureCarnegie Mellon UniversityPittsburghUnited States
  3. 3.School of DesignCarnegie Mellon UniversityPittsburghUnited States
  4. 4.Realty Services, PNC BankPittsburghUnited States

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