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Somneo: Device with Thermal Stimulation for Modulating Sleep Architecture and Enhancing Neuro-Cognitive Function

  • Catherine McConnell
  • Djordje Popovic
  • Chris Berka
  • Dan Levendowski
  • Gene Davis
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8534)

Abstract

Sleep deprivation and inefficiency can have a crucial impact on performance. One potential method for ameliorating the impact of bad sleep, or eliminating it all-together, is with sleep stage-dependent sensory stimulation. The effect of superficial facial heating on sleep architecture was studied in 10 subjects. A 20% decrease in sleep onset latency (p < 0.05) was measured when the face was heated by 1oC. These results are support for further development of the patented Somneo, a ubiquitous feedback device for optimizing sleep architecture and duration; through the real-time assessment of sleep stage, and delivery of stage-dependent thermal, visual and/or auditory sensory stimulation.

Keywords

Sleep Sleep Deprivation Sensory Stimulation Performance Optimization Wearable Devices 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Catherine McConnell
    • 1
  • Djordje Popovic
    • 1
    • 2
  • Chris Berka
    • 1
  • Dan Levendowski
    • 1
  • Gene Davis
    • 1
  1. 1.Advanced Brain MonitoringCarlsbadUSA
  2. 2.University of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA

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