Abstract

Currently, information required to make informed choices of appropriate assistive technology products is scattered among broad, general-purpose databases and narrow, focused databases. The vocabulary used to describe features has not been standardized, and can be very hard to interpret by end-users of assistive technology. The described project will create a federated Unified Listing of assistive technologies for information and communication technologies, and develop a Shopping Aid, using information provided by the individual to filter products and services from the Unified Listing to those that are relevant to the individual. By examining needs information across users, the Shopping Aid will be able to suggest additional needs that are common among people like the user, and to make recommendations for upgrading choices when the probably benefit exceeds the individual’s cost of change.

Keywords

GPII Supported Decision Making Federated Database Shopping Aid 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Denis Anson
    • 1
  • Yao Ding
    • 2
  1. 1.Misericordia UniversityDallasUSA
  2. 2.Trace CenterUniversity of Wisconsin-MadisonUSA

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