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Tapology: A Game-Based Platform to Facilitate E-Health and E-Inclusion

  • Kenneth C. Scott-Brown
  • Julie Harris
  • Anita Simmers
  • Mhairi Thurston
  • Malath Abbas
  • Tom de Majo
  • Ian Reynolds
  • Gareth Robinson
  • Iain Mitchell
  • Dan Gilmour
  • Santiago Martinez
  • John Isaacs
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8515)

Abstract

We have developed a tablet computer game app for low vision users that can be used to introduce a platform for gaming, internet and visual rehabilitation to older users who have not had prior experience with information communication technology (ICT). Our target user group is people diagnosed with Age Related Macular Degeneration (AMD). The primary goal of the app is to present a fun and engaging means for participants to engage with Information Communication Technology (ICT). A long-term goal of the project is to build a platform to gather data on current and on-going visual function by creating a suite of games that could generate sufficient regular visual engagement to enable perceptual learning in the preserved peripheral retina that is spared in AMD. The inclusive design process took into consideration the perceptual and cognitive constraints of the user group in. The ‘Tapology©’ app was formally launched at a large computer games festival where we gathered data from a range of users to inform the development of the gameplay. The initial results and feedback inform the ultimate goal of creating a suite of applications that have a wide social and geographic reach to promote and inform e-inclusion and e-health.

Keywords

E-Health E-Inclusion Games co-design accessible design Mobile HCI 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenneth C. Scott-Brown
    • 1
  • Julie Harris
    • 2
  • Anita Simmers
    • 3
  • Mhairi Thurston
    • 1
  • Malath Abbas
    • 4
  • Tom de Majo
    • 4
  • Ian Reynolds
    • 4
  • Gareth Robinson
    • 4
  • Iain Mitchell
    • 1
  • Dan Gilmour
    • 5
  • Santiago Martinez
    • 6
  • John Isaacs
    • 5
  1. 1.School of Social and Health SciencesAbertay UniversityDundeeUK
  2. 2.School of Psychology and NeuroscienceUniversity of St AndrewsFifeUK
  3. 3.Vision Sciences DepartmentGlasgow Caledonian UniversityGlasgowUK
  4. 4.Quartic LlamaDundeeUK
  5. 5.School of Science, Engineering & TechnologyAbertay UniversityDundeeUK
  6. 6.Center for eHealth and Healthcare TechnologyUniversity of AgderGrimstadNorway

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