Advertisement

Designing Sociable CULOT as a Playground Character

  • Nihan Karatas
  • Nozomi Kina
  • Daiki Tanaka
  • Naoki Ohshima
  • P. Ravindra S. De Silva
  • Michio Okada
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8514)

Abstract

CULOT is designed as a playground character with the aim of grounding the playground language (verbal, non-verbal, playing-rules, etc) between children through play-routing while experiencing the pleasure of play. A robot establishes ”persuasiveness” activities inside the playground, through the process of generating play rules/contexts and executive social interactions and engagement toward the intention of ”attachment” of the children to the robot through interaction and activities. The behavior of the robot plays a significant role in executing the above playground activities (or interaction). As a primary study, our focus is to explore how robot behaviors (cues) are capable of generating the playground rules, social interaction and engagement in order to convey its intention to children and extract the potential dimensions in order to design CULOT behaviors as a playground character by considering the above factors.

Keywords

Playground language persuasiveness attachment 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Brown, J.G., Burger, C.: Playground design and preschool children’s behaviors. Environments and Behavior 16, 599–626 (1984)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Copple, C., Bredekamp, S.: Developmentally Appropriate Practice in Early Childhood Programs Serving Children from Birth through Age 8. National Association for the Education of Young Children, Washington, DC (2009)Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Cox, T.F., Cox, M.A.A.: Multidimensional Scaling. Chapman and Hall (1994)Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Ferari, E., Robins, B., Dautenhahn, K.: Robot as a social mediator - a play scenario implementation with children with autism. In: 8th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children, IDC 2009 (2009)Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Frost, J.: Children’s Play and Playgrounds. Allyn and Bacon, Boston (1979)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Ho, W.C., Dautenhahn, K.: Designing an educational game facilitating children’s understanding of the development of social relationships using iVAs with social group dynamics. In: Ruttkay, Z., Kipp, M., Nijholt, A., Vilhjálmsson, H.H. (eds.) IVA 2009. LNCS, vol. 5773, pp. 502–503. Springer, Heidelberg (2009)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Ito, M., Tani, J.: Joint attention between a humanoid robot and users in imitation game (2004)Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Johnson, J.E., Christie, J.F., Wardle, F.: Play, Development and Early Education. Pearson (2004)Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Kwon, K.-A., Bingham, G., Lewsader, J., Jeon, H.-J., Elicker, J.: Structured task versus free play: The influence of social context on parenting quality, toddlers’ engagement with parents and play behaviors, and parent? toddler language use. Child & Youth Care Forum 42(3), 207–224 (2013)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Nelson, S.: Play: Structured or Unstructured? Otago Polytechnic (2012)Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Okada, M., Sakamoto, S., Suzuki, N.: Muu: Artificial creatures as an embodied interface. In: ACM SIGGRAPH Conference Abstracts and Applications, p. 91 (2000)Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Robert, D., Breazeal, C.: Blended reality characters. In: HRI, pp. 359–366 (2012)Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Robins, B., Dautenhahn, K.: Developing play scenarios for tactile interaction with a humanoid robot: A case study exploration with children with autism. In: Ge, S.S., Li, H., Cabibihan, J.-J., Tan, Y.K. (eds.) ICSR 2010. LNCS, vol. 6414, pp. 243–252. Springer, Heidelberg (2010)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Sawyers, J.: The preschool playground: Developing skills through outdoor play. The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance 65 (1994)Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Werry, I., Dautenhahn, K.: Applying mobile robot technology to the rehabilitation of autistic children proceedings. In: 7th International Symposium on Intelligent Robotic Systems, pp. 265–272 (1999)Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Yamaji, Y., Miyake, T., Yoshiike, Y., Silva, P.R.S.D., Okada, M.: Stb: Child-dependent sociable trash box. I. J. Social Robotics 3(4), 359–370 (2011)CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nihan Karatas
    • 1
  • Nozomi Kina
    • 1
  • Daiki Tanaka
    • 1
  • Naoki Ohshima
    • 1
  • P. Ravindra S. De Silva
    • 1
  • Michio Okada
    • 1
  1. 1.Interactions and Communication Design LabToyohashi University of TechnologyToyohashiJapan

Personalised recommendations