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Eye Tracking on a Paper Survey: Implications for Design

  • Lauren Walton
  • Jennifer C. Romano Bergstrom
  • David Charles Hawkins
  • Christine Pierce
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8514)

Abstract

Asking respondents to record their activity in a diary can be a difficult task due to retrospective reporting and cognitive burden as well as the complexity of the data collection tool. Diary questionnaires typically require multiple pieces of information including demographics, activities, and duration over a data collection period. Like other questionnaire types, visual design principles can be used to help people perceive and understand what is being asked of them during diary measurement. Eye tracking, a technology that allows us to passively study people’s eye movements, has been used mostly for questionnaire testing within the survey research field. This study focuses on using eye tracking and other user experience measures to analyze how respondents perceive, understand and experience different designs of the paper Nielsen TV Diary. We used eye tracking to gain insights into visual elements that draw attention, the amount of text that respondents read (e.g., terms/instructions), and how respondents complete the survey. This paper centers on the collecting and analyzing of qualitative and quantitative measures of the user experience, including eye-tracking data (e.g., fixation count, time to fixate), participants’ verbalizations, self-reported satisfaction, and performance data (e.g., accuracy, steps to complete). We also provide recommendations about the design of the paper diary based on the user experience and eye-tracking results.

Keywords

Eye tracking survey diary visual design usability 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lauren Walton
    • 1
  • Jennifer C. Romano Bergstrom
    • 2
  • David Charles Hawkins
    • 2
  • Christine Pierce
    • 1
  1. 1.The Nielsen CompanyTampaUSA
  2. 2.Fors Marsh GroupArlingtonUSA

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