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Comparing Chinese and German’s Emotional Reaction to Perfume

  • Mengyu Guo
  • Zhe Chen
  • Hui Li
  • Pei-Luen Patrick Rau
  • Long Zeng
  • Xiangheng Wang
  • Nico Wendler
  • Lahcen Feddol
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8528)

Abstract

In this study of comparing Chinese and German’s emotional reaction to perfume, three kinds of measurements including Self-report, Facial Action Coding System (FACS), Skin Conductance are used for measuring participants’ emotions to 6 types of perfume with the objectives of: 1) validating the measurements of emotion to perfume, 2) describing the relationship between perfume and emotion and 3) comparing the cultural difference between Chinese and German regarding their emotions to perfume. The experiment results indicate that the three types of measurements are all effective to describe emotions to perfume and some interesting findings about the emotional reaction to perfume are noticed using the three measurements together. The cultural differences between Chinese and German are found in two aspects: 1) Chinese tend to more like perfume of Green tea and 2) Chinese tend to show no emotional response on face even if they have stronger feelings inside.

Keywords

Cultural difference emotional reaction perfume emotion measurements 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mengyu Guo
    • 1
  • Zhe Chen
    • 1
  • Hui Li
    • 1
  • Pei-Luen Patrick Rau
    • 1
  • Long Zeng
    • 1
  • Xiangheng Wang
    • 1
  • Nico Wendler
    • 1
  • Lahcen Feddol
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Human Factors and Ergonomics, Department of Industrial EngineeringTsinghua UniversityBeijingP.R.C.

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