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Introduction to Anticancer Drugs from Marine Origin

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Handbook of Anticancer Drugs from Marine Origin

Abstract

The chemical and biological diversity of the marine environment is extraordinary resource for the discovery of new anticancer drugs. Recent technological and methodological advances in elucidation of structure, synthesis, and biological assay have resulted in the isolation and clinical evaluation of various novel anticancer agents from marine pipeline. To understanding the marine derived anticancer compounds are useful in pharmaceutical industry and clinical applications. The marine sponges , algae , microbes, tunicates and other species from the marine pipeline are the important sources for biological active compounds. The past decade has seen a dramatic increase in the number of preclinical anticancer lead compounds from diverse marine life enter human clinical trials.

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Kim, SK., Kalimuthu, S. (2015). Introduction to Anticancer Drugs from Marine Origin. In: Kim, SK. (eds) Handbook of Anticancer Drugs from Marine Origin. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-07145-9_1

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