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Comparison of Manual and Image Processing Methods of End-Milling Burr Measurement

  • R. V. SharanEmail author
  • G. C. Onwubolu
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Electrical Engineering book series (LNEE, volume 313)

Abstract

This paper compares the results for manual method of burr height measurement with the image-processing technique for end-milled work-pieces under various conditions. The manual method refers to the traditional way where a few readings are taken at random locations using a microscope and the burr height is approximated with an average value. In contrast, the image processing technique analyzes the whole burr profile as seen through the lens of the microscope and captured using a digital camera. With the results obtained using the image processing method as reference, the results show a significant difference between the two average readings in most cases and generally the percentage error is greater for work-pieces with irregular burrs.

Keywords

End-milling Burr height Image processing 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Engineering and PhysicsUniversity of the South PacificSuvaFiji
  2. 2.Knowledge Management and MiningTorontoCanada

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