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Case Study: Challenges and Issues in Teaching Fully Online Mechanical Engineering Courses

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Part of the Lecture Notes in Electrical Engineering book series (LNEE,volume 312)

Abstract

Every year more engineering programs are looking at online courses as a way to expand their programs and facilitate the educational goals of working professionals. This case study summarizes specific challenges faced by two faculty members in preparing and presenting six mechanical engineering classes, all core classes at either the graduate or undergraduate level, in a fully online format. The challenges discussed involve course preparation and planning, interaction with and among students, lack of student preparation, and exams.

Keywords

  • Distance education
  • Online education
  • Engineering education
  • Mechanical engineering

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  • DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-06764-3_74
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Correspondence to Sara McCaslin .

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McCaslin, S., Brown, F. (2015). Case Study: Challenges and Issues in Teaching Fully Online Mechanical Engineering Courses. In: Elleithy, K., Sobh, T. (eds) New Trends in Networking, Computing, E-learning, Systems Sciences, and Engineering. Lecture Notes in Electrical Engineering, vol 312. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-06764-3_74

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-06764-3_74

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  • Publisher Name: Springer, Cham

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-319-06763-6

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-319-06764-3

  • eBook Packages: EngineeringEngineering (R0)