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Cyberlaundering: Concept & Practice

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Part of the Law, Governance and Technology Series book series (LGTS, volume 19)

Abstract

This chapter investigates the concept of cyberlaundering and attempts to deconstruct the concept legally (See Leslie (2010, Chap. 3)). Bearing in mind that cyberlaundering borders the fields of money laundering and cyber crime, the chapter starts off by investigating the rationale behind the advent of cyberlaundering. Furthermore, this chapter attempts to understand and categorize cyberlaundering as a legal concept.

This chapter also delves further into some technical aspects of cyberlaundering by assessing the ‘tools’ used for cyberlaundering, in the form of electronic payment systems, which are conducive to the commission of the crime. One needs to understand this at the outset in order to fully grasp the different methods and techniques used by criminals on the internet. This enables one to get an idea of what cyberlaundering might look like in the future. The latter is important for two primary reasons: First, given that the understanding of the cyberlaundering phenomenon is limited, it would be useful to describe the current trend, in order to understand aspects of cyberlaundering better. Secondly, knowing the direction in which the cyberlaundering wind is blowing helps to devise the regulatory legal framework to minimize the dangers it poses.

Keywords

Smart Card Virtual World Money Laundering Second Life Online Gambling 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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  3. CyberAngels. <http://www.cyberangels.org/>. Accessed 4 April 2013.
  4. CyberCash. <http://www.cybercash.com>. Accessed 4 Aug. 2013.
  5. Drug Enforcement Administration. <http://www.justice.gov/dea/programs/money.html>. Accessed 30 Jan. 2013.
  6. Ecash. <http://www.ecash.com/online/>. Accessed 4 Aug. 2013.
  7. Financial Crimes Enforcement Network. <http://www.fincen.gov/about_fincen/wwd/>. Accessed 9 Aug. 2013.
  8. Financial Sector Assessment Program. <http://www.imf.org/about/projects/worldbank>. Accessed 13 Aug. 2010.
  9. Freedom Eagle Card. <http://www.freedom-card.co.uk/>. Accessed 2 Sept. 2010.
  10. Gold and Silver Reserve Inc. <http:www.e-gold.com/unsecure/pgpkey.htm>. Accessed 13 Feb. 2013.
  11. Internet Hotlines Providers. <http://www.inhope.org/gns/home.aspx>. Accessed 4 April 2013.
  12. International Telecommunications Union. <http://www.itu.int/africainternet2000/Documents/doc7_e.htm>. Accessed 13 June 2013.
  13. Internet Watch Foundation. <http://www.iwf.org.uk/>. Accessed 4 April 2013.
  14. Internet World Stats. <http://www.internetworldstats.com/stats/htm>. Accessed 15 July 2013.
  15. NetCash. <http://www.netbank.com/~netcash>. Accessed 4 Aug. 2013.
  16. Treaties Office of the Council of Europe. <http://conventions.coe.int/>. Accessed 9 Feb. 2013.
  17. United States Department of Justice. <http://www.justice.gov/criminal/ceos/Press%20Releases/DC%20egold%20indictment.pdf>. Accessed 13 Feb. 2013.
  18. Wolfsberg Group of Banks. <http://www.wolfsberg-principles.com/index.html>. Accessed 6 Aug. 2013.

Singapore

  1. Statement of Stanley Morris, Director of FinCEN. 2005. Address to congress banking committee. <http://www.fincen.org/resource>. Accessed 17 June 2013.

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Shearman & Sterling LLPParisFrance

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