Simulation Management Systems Developed by the Northern Gulf Coastal Hazards Collaboratory (NG-CHC): An Overview of Cyberinfrastructure to Support the Coastal Modeling Community in the Gulf of Mexico

  • Robert R. Twilley
  • Steve Brandt
  • Darlene Breaux
  • John Cartwright
  • Jim Chen
  • Greg Easson
  • Patrick Fitzpatrick
  • Kenneth Fridley
  • Sara Graves
  • Sandra Harper
  • Carola Kaiser
  • Alexander Maestre
  • Manil Maskey
  • William H. McAnally
  • John McCorquodale
  • Ehab Meselhe
  • Tina Miller-Way
  • Kyeong Park
  • Joao Pereira
  • Thomas Richardson
  • Jian Tao
  • Amelia Ward
  • Jerry Wiggert
  • Derek Williamson
Chapter
Part of the Coastal Research Library book series (COASTALRL, volume 9)

Abstract

Given the significance of natural and built assets of the Gulf of Mexico region, the three states of Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi, leveraged their unique partnerships, proximity, and significant prior investments in cyberinfrastructure (CI) to develop the Northern Gulf Coastal Hazards Collaboratory (NG-CHC). This collaboratory was established to catalyze collaborative research via enhanced CI to reduce the regions vulnerability to natural and human disasters by facilitating high performance modeling to test hypotheses focused on engineering design, coastal system response, and risk management of coastal hazards. The objective of the NG-CHC is to advance research and inspire collaboration through highly available innovation-enabling CI, with a particular focus on geosciences and engineering from the watershed to the coast. An integrated CI capable of simulating all relevant interacting processes is needed to implement a system that captures the dynamic nature of coastal surface processes. The NG-CHC has implemented CI to locate appropriate data and computational resources, create necessary workflows associated with different simulation demands, and provide visualization tools for analysis of results. Three simulation management systems, SIMULOCEAN, SULIS, and ASGS, were implemented, each with a defined suite of hypotheses and institutional participants to run collaborator experiments. The NG-CHC focused on developing suites of CI tools centered on handling the functional needs of each simulation management system in a collaborative environment. The NG-CHC also developed curriculum units, computer games and simulations to extend the knowledge of coastal hazards to students from middle school to college. Education and outreach activities were developed to increase public understanding and support for sustainable coastal practices. The elements of the CI tool box within NG-CHC describe generic tools needed to promote a ‘collaborative modeling environment’ in other coastal systems.

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research was supported by NSF EPSCoR Program with cooperative agreements to the following institutions: EPS-1010640 to Louisiana Board of Regents; EPS-1010578 to Mississippi State University; and EPS-1010607 to The University of Alabama in Huntsville. We appreciate the leadership of Michael M. Khonsari (Louisiana Board of Regents), Sandra H. Harpole (Mississippi State University) and Sara J. Graves (The University of Alabama in Huntsville) for guidance through this collaborative research program.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert R. Twilley
    • 1
  • Steve Brandt
    • 2
  • Darlene Breaux
    • 3
  • John Cartwright
    • 4
  • Jim Chen
    • 2
    • 5
  • Greg Easson
    • 6
  • Patrick Fitzpatrick
    • 7
  • Kenneth Fridley
    • 8
  • Sara Graves
    • 9
  • Sandra Harper
    • 9
  • Carola Kaiser
    • 1
    • 2
  • Alexander Maestre
    • 8
  • Manil Maskey
    • 9
  • William H. McAnally
    • 4
  • John McCorquodale
    • 10
  • Ehab Meselhe
    • 3
    • 11
  • Tina Miller-Way
    • 12
  • Kyeong Park
    • 12
  • Joao Pereira
    • 10
  • Thomas Richardson
    • 13
  • Jian Tao
    • 2
  • Amelia Ward
    • 14
  • Jerry Wiggert
    • 15
  • Derek Williamson
    • 8
  1. 1.Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences, School of the Coast and EnvironmentLouisiana State UniversityBaton RougeUSA
  2. 2.Center for Computation and TechnologyLouisiana State UniversityBaton RougeUSA
  3. 3.Department of Civil EngineeringUniversity of Louisiana at LafayetteLafayetteUSA
  4. 4.Geosystems Research InstituteMississippi State UniversityMississippi StateUSA
  5. 5.Department of Civil and Environmental EngineeringLouisiana State UniversityBaton RougeUSA
  6. 6.Department of Geology and Geological EngineeringUniversity of MississippiOxfordUSA
  7. 7.Northern Gulf InstituteMississippi State University Science and Technology Center, Stennis Space CenterMississippi StateUSA
  8. 8.Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental EngineeringUniversity of AlabamaTuscaloosaUSA
  9. 9.Information Technology and Systems CenterUniversity of Alabama in HuntsvilleHuntsvilleUSA
  10. 10.Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and Pontchartrain Institute for Environmental SciencesUniversity of New OrleansNew OrleansUSA
  11. 11.The Water Institute of the GulfBaton RougeUSA
  12. 12.Department of Marine SciencesUniversity of South Alabama, Dauphin Island Sea LabDauphin IslandUSA
  13. 13.Jackson State UniversityJacksonUSA
  14. 14.Center for Freshwater StudiesUniversity of AlabamaTuscaloosaUSA
  15. 15.Department of Marine SciencesUniversity of Southern Mississippi, Stennis Space CenterHattiesburgUSA

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