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The Bank of Amsterdam Through the Lens of Monetary Competition

Chapter
Part of the Financial and Monetary Policy Studies book series (FMPS, volume 39)

Abstract

We examine the experience of an innovative fiat money regime, introduced by the Bank of Amsterdam in the late seventeenth century and persisting until the downfall of the Dutch Republic in 1795. The pan-European competition among international monies occurred beyond the legal domain of any one political authority, or cluster of local authorities. Competition was not framed by legally derived spillovers, so bad money was shunned.

Keywords

Pure Silver Legal Tender Silver Coin Fiat Money Monetary Institution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Texas Christian UniversityFort WorthUSA
  2. 2.Federal Reserve Bank of AtlantaAtlantaUSA

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