A Legal Perspective on Three Misconceptions in Vehicle Automation

Chapter
Part of the Lecture Notes in Mobility book series (LNMOB)

Abstract

In this chapter I address three commonly misunderstood aspects of vehicle automation: capability, deployment, and connectivity. For each, I identify a myth pervading public discussion, provide a contradictory view common among experts, explain why that expert view is itself incomplete, and finally discuss the legal implications of this nuance. Although there are many more aspects that merit clarification, these three are linked because they suggest a shift in transportation from a product model to a service model, a point with which I conclude.

Keywords

Vehicle automation Automated driving Autonomous driving Self-driving Driverless Law Regulation  Tort law Levels of automation DSRC V2V V2I V2X Telematics NHTSA 

References

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    Smith BW (2012) (forthcoming) Automated vehicles are probably legal in the United States. In: Center for Internet and Society. Texas A&M Law Rev 2014. Available at http://ssrn.com/abstract=2303904
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    Smith BW (2013) Driverless carts are coming sooner than driverless cars, Blog Post. Sep 2013. Available at https://cyberlaw.stanford.edu/blog/2013/09/driverless-carts-are-coming-sooner-driverless-cars
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    Smith BW, Planning for the obsolescence of technologies not yet invented, Blog Post, Oct 2013. Available at https://cyberlaw.stanford.edu/blog/2013/10/planning-obsolescence-technologies-not-yet-invented
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    Smith BW (2014) (forthcoming) Proximity-driven liability, Georgetown Law Rev. Available at http://ssrn.com/abstract=2336234

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of South Carolina School of LawColumbiaUSA
  2. 2.Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law SchoolStanfordUSA
  3. 3.Center for Automotive Research at Stanford (CARS)StanfordUSA

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