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Architecture for Serious Games in Health Rehabilitation

  • Paula Alexandra Rego
  • Pedro Miguel Moreira
  • Luís Paulo Reis
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 276)

Abstract

Serious Games is a field of research that has been growing substantially with valuable contributions to many application areas. Traditional rehabilitation approaches are often considered repetitive and boring by the patients, resulting in difficulties to maintain their interest and to assure the completion of the treatment program. This paper describes a framework for the development of Serious Games that integrates a rich set of features including natural and multimodal interaction, social skills (collaboration and competitiveness) and progress monitoring which can be used to improve the designed games with direct benefits to the rehabilitation process. This improvement in the games’ rehabilitation efficacy mainly arises from an increase in the patient’s motivation when exercising the rehabilitation tasks due to the rich set of features provide by the framework.

Keywords

Serious Games Rehabilitation Architecture Natural User Interfaces Multimodal Interfaces Health Informatics 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paula Alexandra Rego
    • 1
    • 3
  • Pedro Miguel Moreira
    • 1
    • 3
  • Luís Paulo Reis
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.ESTG - Escola Superior de Tecnologia e GestãoIPVC - Instituto Politécnico de Viana do CasteloViana do CasteloPortugal
  2. 2.DSI - Departamento de Sistemas de InformaçãoEscola de Engenharia da Universidade do MinhoGuimarãesPortugal
  3. 3.LIACC, Laboratório de Inteligência Artificial e Ciência de ComputadoresPortoPortugal

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