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Analysis of Merge and Diverge Segments

  • Roger P. RoessEmail author
  • Elena S. Prassas
Chapter
  • 1.6k Downloads
Part of the Springer Tracts on Transportation and Traffic book series (STTT, volume 5)

Abstract

The essence of uninterrupted flow facilities is that vehicles can enter and leave the traffic stream without requiring mainline traffic to stop. On freeways and many multilane highways, this is accomplished through on-ramps and off-ramps. Typically, on- and off-ramps consist of one lane, generally located on the right side of the freeway or multilane highway.

Keywords

Transportation Research Traffic Stream Influence Area Demand Volume Highway Capacity Manual 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.EmeritusNYU Polytechnic School of EngineeringNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Transportation EngineeringNYU Polytechnic School of EngineeringNew YorkUSA

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