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The Exodus and the Bible: What Was Known; What Was Remembered; What Was Forgotten?

  • William G. Dever
Part of the Quantitative Methods in the Humanities and Social Sciences book series (QMHSS)

Abstract

This chapter offers an archaeological critique of the current model of the Hebrew Bible as “cultural memory” with particular reference to the exodus–conquest narrative. Instead of asking how these texts functioned socially, religiously, and culturally, this chapter asks “What Really Happened?” This approach will facilitate a critique of the literary tradition based on external rather than internal evidence, attempting to isolate a “core history.”

Keywords

Cultural Memory Biblical Text Biblical Story Biblical Scholar Biblical Narrative 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Near Eastern StudiesUniversity of ArizonaTucsonUSA
  2. 2.Lycoming CollegeWilliamsportUSA

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