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Evaluation of Cloud Chemistry Mechanism Towards Laboratory Experiments

  • Yoann LongEmail author
  • Laurent Deguillaume
  • Nadine Chaumerliac
Conference paper
Part of the Springer Proceedings in Complexity book series (SPCOM)

Abstract

Cloud chemistry models include more and more explicit multiphase mechanisms based on laboratory experiments that provide kinetic constants, stability constants of complexes, hydration constant, etc. However, they are still subject to many uncertainties, related to the aqueous chemical mechanism they used which most of the time has never been confronted against laboratory experimental data. To fill this gap, we propose to adapt the M2C2 model to simulate irradiation experiments on synthetic aqueous solutions under controlled conditions (pH, pressure, temperature, light intensity,…) considering various chemical compounds that are supposed to contribute to the oxidative budget in cloud water (iron, oxidants such as H2O2). As target species, organic compounds (oxalic, formic, acetic acids) are taken into account since they are oxidized and are also good indicators of the oxidative capacity and potential iron complexant. Range of concentrations for all the studied chemical compounds are representative of in situ measurements. Numerical outputs are confronted to experimental data that consist in time evolution of the concentration of target species (Long Y, Charbouillot T, Brigante M, Mailhot G, Delort A-M, Chaumerliac N, Deguillaume L, Evaluation of modeled cloud chemistry mechanism against laboratory irradiation experiments: the HxOy/iron/carboxylic acid chemical system. Atmos Environ 77:686–695; 2013).

Keywords

Oxalic Acid Cloud Water Generate Hydroxyl Radical Oxalic Acid Concentration M2C2 Model 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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    Long Y, Charbouillot T, Brigante M, Mailhot G, Delort A-M, Chaumerliac N, Deguillaume L (2013) Evaluation of modeled cloud chemistry mechanism against laboratory irradiation experiments: the HxOy/iron/carboxylic acid chemical system. Atmos Environ 77:686–695CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yoann Long
    • 1
    Email author
  • Laurent Deguillaume
    • 1
  • Nadine Chaumerliac
    • 1
  1. 1.LaMP, CNRSUniversité Blaise PascalAubièreFrance

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