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Use of Air Quality Modeling Results in Health Effects Research

  • Armistead RussellEmail author
  • Heather Holmes
  • Mariel Friberg
  • Cesunica Ivey
  • Yongtao Hu
  • Siv Balachandran
  • James Mulholland
  • Paige Tolbert
  • Jeremy Sarnat
  • Stefanie Sarnat
  • Matt Strickland
  • Howard Chang
  • Yang Liu
Conference paper
Part of the Springer Proceedings in Complexity book series (SPCOM)

Abstract

The most recent Global Burden of Disease study (Lim SS et al, Lancet 380(9859):2224–2260, 2012), for example, finds that combined exposure to ambient and indoor air pollution is one of the top five risks worldwide. Of particular concern is particulate matter (PM). Health researchers are now trying to assess how this mixture of air pollutants links to various health outcomes and how to tie the mixture components and health outcomes back to sources. This process involves the use of air quality models. As part of an EPA Clean Air Research Center, the Southeastern Center for Air Pollution and Epidemiology (SCAPE), a variety of air quality models are being developed and applied to provide enhanced temporal and spatial resolution of pollutant concentrations for use in epidemiologic analysis. Air quality models that are being further developed and used as part of the center include Bayesian-based ensemble methods and hybrid chemical transport-chemical mass balance modeling. The hybrid method uses knowledge of the emissions, modeling and measurement uncertainties, and can provide spatially and temporally complete pollutant fields.

Keywords

Chemical Transport Model Source Impact Mass Balance Method Water Soluble Organic Compound Pollutant Field 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was made possible in part by USEPA STAR grants R833626, R833866 and R834799 and by NASA project SV6-76007 under grant NNG04GE15G. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the grantee and do not necessarily represent the official views of the USEPA and NASA. Further, neither USEPA nor NASA endorses the purchase of any commercial products or services mentioned in the publication. We also acknowledge the Southern Company for their support and thank Eric Edgerton of ARA, Inc. for access to the SEARCH data.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Armistead Russell
    • 1
    Email author
  • Heather Holmes
    • 1
  • Mariel Friberg
    • 1
  • Cesunica Ivey
    • 1
  • Yongtao Hu
    • 1
  • Siv Balachandran
    • 1
  • James Mulholland
    • 1
  • Paige Tolbert
    • 2
  • Jeremy Sarnat
    • 2
  • Stefanie Sarnat
    • 2
  • Matt Strickland
    • 2
  • Howard Chang
    • 2
  • Yang Liu
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Civil and Environmental EngineeringGeorgia Institute of TechnologyAtlantaUSA
  2. 2.Rollins School of Public HealthEmory UniversityAtlantaUSA

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