Conceptual Spaces for Emotion Identification and Alignment

  • Maurice Grinberg
  • Evgeniya Hristova
  • Monika Moudova
  • James Boster
Part of the Smart Innovation, Systems and Technologies book series (SIST, volume 26)

Abstract

The paper explores a method for emotion identification based on the mapping of emotional terms to a set of emotion eliciting situations. The method has been applied for emotion words from the Bulgarian language. Situations and words have been evaluated using the valence, arousal, and dominance ratings given by participants. Nine clusters of emotion terms and situations have been identified which allowed to map emotion terms with situations. The mapping method and the results for Bulgarian can be used for cross-group or cross-cultural studies of emotions involving various languages. The possible usage of the results obtained for emotion conceptual space evaluation and emotional alignment of people communicating in social networks is also discussed.

Keywords

emotions conceptual spaces mapping emotional terms and situations 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maurice Grinberg
    • 1
  • Evgeniya Hristova
    • 1
  • Monika Moudova
    • 1
  • James Boster
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Cognitive Science and PsychologyNew Bulgarian UniversitySofiaBulgaria
  2. 2.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of ConnecticutStorrsUSA

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