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Language and Gender Effect in Decoding Emotional Information: A Study on Lithuanian Subjects

  • Maria Teresa Riviello
  • Rytis Maskeliunas
  • Jadvyga Kruminiene
  • Anna Esposito
Part of the Smart Innovation, Systems and Technologies book series (SIST, volume 26)

Abstract

The present work explores how language specificity and gender affect the emotional decoding process. It investigates the ability of Lithuanian male and female subjects to decode emotional information through male and female vocal and visual emotional expressions. The exploited emotional stimuli are based on extracts of American English (a globally spread language), and Italian (a country specific language) movies. The assumption is that the recognition of the emotional states expressed by the actors/actresses will change according to the familiarity of the languages and the subjects’ gender. Results show that Lithuanian subjects recognition accuracy is affected by the language specificity of the stimuli. Moreover, a gender effect occurs in decoding Italian vocal stimuli.

Keywords

Emotional information decoding process Language specificity Gender effect 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maria Teresa Riviello
    • 1
    • 2
  • Rytis Maskeliunas
    • 3
  • Jadvyga Kruminiene
    • 4
  • Anna Esposito
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologySeconda Università di NapoliCasertaItaly
  2. 2.International Institute for Advanced Scientific Studies (IIASS)SalernoItaly
  3. 3.Information Technology Development InstituteKaunas Univerisity of TechnologyKaunasLithuania
  4. 4.Kaunas Faculty of HumanitiesVilnius UniversityKaunasLithuania

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