Social and Environmental Enterprises in Africa: Context, Convergence and Characteristics

Chapter

Abstract

This chapter provides an overview of the landscape of social and environmental entrepreneurship in Africa. Utilizing quantitative data on 270 social and environmental enterprises operating in Eastern and Southern Africa, some key characteristics of these kinds of enterprises are identified. These characteristics are reflected upon through a contextual lens contributing to wider debates about the nature of social and environmental entrepreneurship and enterprises in Africa. Drawing upon notions of hybridity, and sustainability oriented entrepreneurship, consideration is furthermore given to the convergence of social and environmental goals in these kinds of businesses, and in wider social and environmental innovation in Africa.

Keywords

Social entrepreneurship Environmental enterprises Hybrid sustainable enterprises Africa 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Henley Business SchoolUniversity of ReadingHenley-on-ThamesUK
  2. 2.Essex Business SchoolUniversity of EssexColchesterUK

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