Key Factors for the Successful Implementation of Stakeholder Partnerships: The Case of the African Cashew initiative

Chapter

Abstract

The implementation of sustainable development efforts often requires finding joint solutions to complex challenges and cooperation between different societal actors in order to pool expertise and resources. Such cross-sector stakeholder partnerships require patience and persistence, but, when managed well, they can build the cross-sector stability we need to address global challenges and find innovative solutions. Any attempt to initiate, implement or facilitate such cooperation processes is an intervention into a fragile and often controversial system of actors, requiring careful attention to the quality of relationships and interaction among stakeholders. This chapter discusses the main concepts related to multi-stakeholder partnerships and the key factors for their successful implementation. Laying out a methodological background developed by the Collective Leadership Institute (CLI) and drawing on its 2 years of extensive experience with the African Cashew initiative (ACi), the chapter elaborates on eight key factors for the success of complex stakeholder partnerships and illustrates their relevance with a series of examples from the initiative.

Keywords

Multi-stakeholder partnerships Dialogic change model Partnership implementation 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Collective Leadership InstitutePotsdamGermany

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