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Diagnosis and Treatment

  • Ralph M. Trüeb
  • Won-Soo Lee
Chapter

Abstract

Clinical trichology should represent an integral part of medical training, and the dermatologist participates with the other medical disciplines in the diagnosis and treatment of all types of hair problems relating to systemic disease. On the other hand, hair loss is an important cause of discomfort and disability. The general physician is not always aware of the significance of hair loss and therefore may fail to refer patients with hair disorders to the dermatologist for appropriate management. Too often, the delay of correct diagnosis, and as a result the delay of appropriate therapy, leads to potentially irreversible loss of hair, prolongs the discomfort, and promotes the disfigurement. Knowledge of the main types of hair loss is prerequisite to providing appropriate patient care.

Further Reading

Male Androgenetic Alopecia: Pathobiology of Androgenetic Alopecia

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Male Androgenetic Alopecia: Androgens, Androgen Metabolism, and the Androgen Receptor

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Genetic Involvement

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Male Androgenetic Alopecia: Gene Polymorphism Diagnostics in Androgenetic Alopecia

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Male Androgenetic Alopecia: Syndromatic Androgenetic Alopecia

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Male Androgenetic Alopecia: Premature Alopecia

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Male Androgenetic Alopecia: Clinical Presentations and Classifications

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Male Androgenetic Alopecia: Comorbidities of Male Androgenetic Alopecia

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Male Androgenetic Alopecia: Evidence-Based Pharmacologic Treatments

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Male Androgenetic Alopecia: Autologous Hair Transplantation

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Male Androgenetic Alopecia: Miscellaneous Treatments

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Effect of Cigarette Smoking and UV Radiation: Effect of Cigarette Smoking on Hair Growth

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Effect of Cigarette Smoking and UV Radiation: Effect of UV Radiation on Hair Growth and Scalp Condition

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Effect of Cigarette Smoking and UV Radiation: Diffuse Red Scalp Disease

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Effect of Cigarette Smoking and UV Radiation: Erosive Pustular Dermatosis of the Scalp

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Effect of Cigarette Smoking and UV Radiation: Actinic Field Cancerization of the Bald Scalp

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Effect of Cigarette Smoking and UV Radiation: Hair Photoaging

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Telogen Effluvium: Pathologic Dynamics of Telogen Effluvium

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Hair Aging

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Hair Aging: Senescent Alopecia

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Alopecia with Scarring Phenomena: Male Frontal Fibrosing Alopecia

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Alopecia with Scarring Phenomena: Fibrosing Alopecia in a Pattern Distribution (Cicatricial Pattern Hair Loss)

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Alopecia with Scarring Phenomena: Alopecia Neoplastica

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Dystrophic Anagen Effluvium: Thomas More Syndrome

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Dystrophic Anagen Effluvium: Treatment Algorithm for Alopecia Areata

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Dystrophic Anagen Effluvium: Postoperative Pressure Alopecia

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Dystrophic Anagen Effluvium: Radiation-Induced Temporary Epilation After Neuroradiologically Guided Embolization Procedure

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Dystrophic Anagen Effluvium: Chemotherapy-Induced Hair Loss

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Dystrophic Anagen Effluvium: Side Effects from Molecularly Targeted Therapies for Cancer

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Dystrophic Anagen Effluvium: Toxic Alopecia

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Loose Anagen Hair and Short Anagen Hair of Childhood: Loose Anagen Hair

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Psychocutaneous Disorders of the Hair and Scalp: Trichodynia

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Concept of Multitargeted Treatment: Targeting the Inflammatory Component in Androgenetic Alopecia

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Concept of Multitargeted Treatment: Combination Treatments

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ralph M. Trüeb
    • 1
  • Won-Soo Lee
    • 2
  1. 1.Center for Dermatology and Hair DiseasesWallisellen-ZurichSwitzerland
  2. 2.Department of DermatologyYonsei University Wonju College of MedicineWonju Kangwon-DoKorea Republic of (South Korea)

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