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Study of Light-Induced Structural Changes Associated with Staebler-Wronski Photo-Degradation in Micro-Crystalline Silicon Thin Films

  • Sucheta Juneja
  • S. Sudhakar
  • Kalpana Lodhi
  • Srishti Chugh
  • Mansi Sharma
  • Sushil Kumar
Part of the Environmental Science and Engineering book series (ESE)

Abstract

Hydrogenated amorphous silicon based devices lacks behind in their fruitful applications as it suffers from major drawback i.e. light induced degradation or S–W effect. Various theories or literature have been discussed so far, but exact mechanism is still an open challenge in research community. We report on light-induced structural changes in amorphous and micro/nano crystalline silicon by performing light soaking experiments for nearly 8 h. Under vacuum accompanied with the effect of annealing on these films. The electrical, structural and optical properties were analyzed with the use of dark and photo conductivity measurements, Raman spectroscopy, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Photoluminescence studies. Using Raman spectroscopy, we estimated the bond distortion w.r.t degradation percentage in samples. We observed that crystallinity as well as particle size are responsible for increase or decrease in degradation of photoconductivity. Having 72.25 % crystallinity highly stable microcrystalline silicon films showed 1.44 % photo-degradation.

Keywords

Amorphous and microcrystalline silicon Staebler-wronski effect Light-Induced degradation 

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Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors are thankful to Director, CSIR-NPL, and New Delhi for his kind support and encouragement. We are also thankful to CSIR-India (for TAPSUN program) and MNRE, Govt. of India for the financial support (Sanction No. 31/29/2010-11/PVSE).

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sucheta Juneja
    • 1
  • S. Sudhakar
    • 1
  • Kalpana Lodhi
    • 1
  • Srishti Chugh
    • 1
  • Mansi Sharma
    • 1
  • Sushil Kumar
    • 1
  1. 1.CSIR-Network of Institutes for Solar EnergyCSIR-National Physical LaboratoryNew DelhiIndia

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