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Organisational Challenges of Human–Robot Interaction Systems in Industry: Human Resources Implications

Part of the Management and Industrial Engineering book series (MINEN)

Abstract

In this paper, the social aspects related to new concepts on the complex work environments (CWE) will be analysed, especially those that configure the design of work organisation systems with automated equipment. In such environments, the work with autonomous systems (AS) represents specific options in the design of workplaces. This means that human resources management (HRM) is becoming more decisive for a successful design of a complex and automated system. Traditionally, it was thought that automation would replace operational work and the importance of the dimension of human resource would become less decisive for management option. Most recent studies are demonstrating total different conclusions. We intend to present here some of those results. Another topic covered by this article is the relation of humans with computers in their working environment. That means the role of agents in the human–computer interaction (HCI) (robots, human operators, other automated machinery, sensors) and the implications in the management of human resources. The technology development represents also a challenge for managerial options.

Keywords

  • Human Resource Management
  • Autonomous System
  • Work Organisation
  • European Foundation
  • Organisational Challenge

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Correspondence to António B. Moniz .

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Moniz, A.B. (2014). Organisational Challenges of Human–Robot Interaction Systems in Industry: Human Resources Implications. In: Machado, C., Davim, J. (eds) Human Resource Management and Technological Challenges. Management and Industrial Engineering. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-02618-3_6

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-02618-3_6

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  • Publisher Name: Springer, Cham

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  • Online ISBN: 978-3-319-02618-3

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