The Dicode Data Mining Services

  • Natalja Friesen
  • Max Jakob
  • Jörg Kindermann
  • Doris Maassen
  • Axel Poigné
  • Stefan Rüping
  • Daniel Trabold
Chapter
Part of the Studies in Big Data book series (SBD, volume 5)

Abstract

Real world problems in society, science or economics need human structuring, interpretation and decision making, the limiting factor being the amount of time and effort that the user can invest in the sense-making process. The Dicode data mining services intend to help in clearly defined steps of the sense-making process, where human capacity is most limited and the impact of automatic solutions is most profound. This includes recommendation services to search and filter information, text mining services to search for new information und unknown relations in data, and subgroup discovery services to find and evaluate hypotheses on data. This chapter provides an overview of the data mining services developed in the context of the Dicode project. It addresses the usability of the services and indicates which big data technologies are being used to deal with very large data collections.

Keywords

Data mining Text mining Data-intensiveness Big data Services Usability 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Natalja Friesen
    • 1
  • Max Jakob
    • 2
  • Jörg Kindermann
    • 1
  • Doris Maassen
    • 2
  • Axel Poigné
    • 1
  • Stefan Rüping
    • 1
  • Daniel Trabold
    • 1
  1. 1.Fraunhofer IAISSankt AugustinGermany
  2. 2.Neofonie GMBHBerlinGermany

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