The INTERPOL Approach to Tackling Match Fixing in Football

Chapter

Abstract

Increasingly, professional criminals are operating internationally to exploit football and make money through match fixing and irregular betting. Investigations, whether undertaken by law enforcement or the football authorities, are complex, lengthy, costly and uncertain in their outcome. The major criminals pulling the strings of the criminal networks of match fixers are rarely caught. A more effective approach is to enhance the prevention of match fixing. This chapter provides an overview of the implementation of the INTERPOL – FIFA Initiative which seeks to promote training, education and prevention as an effective response to match fixing in football.

Bibliography

  1. Australian Governments on 10 June 2011; Department of Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport. (2011). National policy on match-fixing in sport (as agreed 10 June 2011). Canberra.Google Scholar
  2. Berninger, A. (2013). Establishing good governance. Presentation to INTERPOL-FIFA National Workshop in Turkey on 4/5 February 2013.Google Scholar
  3. Bower, T. (2007). Broken dreams: Vanity, greed and the souring of British football. London: Simon & Schuster.Google Scholar
  4. Enlarged Partial Agreement on Sport. (2012). Preliminary draft Convention against manipulation of sports results. Strasbourg: Council of Europe.Google Scholar
  5. Council meeting in Brussels on 28/29 November 2011; Council of the European Union. (2011). Council conclusions on combating match-fixing. Brussels.Google Scholar
  6. England and Wales Cricket Board. (2011). Anti-corruption code for players and player support personnel. London.Google Scholar
  7. EUROPOL (2013). Match Fixing: Joint Investigation Team ‘VETO’; press conference slides 4 February 2013;Google Scholar
  8. FIFA (2013). Circular 1336 entitled ‘Integrity Declaration for the international referees, assistant referees (etc) on the 2013 FIFA Lists (22 January 2013);Google Scholar
  9. FIFA regulations and guidelines (2012). Including updated Code of Conduct, Disciplinary Code, Code of Ethics, Match agents regulations, Players’ Agent regulations, Guidelines for FIFA match officials;Google Scholar
  10. FIFA WORLD. (2012). Fighting Talk: An interview with Chris EATON (January/February 2012 edition);Google Scholar
  11. FIFA World. (2012, January/February). Fighting talk: An interview with Chris Eaton. FIFA World, pp. 20–23.Google Scholar
  12. FIFPro Black Book Eastern Europe: The problems professional footballers encounter: research (07 February 2012);Google Scholar
  13. FIFPro. (2012). FIFPro black book Eastern Europe. Netherlands: Author.Google Scholar
  14. Hill, D. (2010). The fix: Soccer and organized crime. Toronto: McClelland & Stewart.Google Scholar
  15. Independent Governance Committee to the Executive Committee of FIFA. (2012). FIFA governance reform project: First report by the independent governance committee to the executive committee of FIFA. Basel, Switzerland: Author.Google Scholar
  16. International Olympic Committee. (2011). Founding working group on the fight against irregular and illegal sports betting (experts meeting 2 November). Lausanne, Switzerland: Author.Google Scholar
  17. International Olympic Committee. (2012, February 2). IOC’s fight against irregular and illegal betting in sport moves into implementation phase. International Olympic Committee. Retrieved from http://www.olympic.org/news/ioc-s-fight-against-irregular-and-illegal-betting-in-sport-moves-to-implementation-phase/151887.
  18. INTERPOL (2011). Notes of the Experts meeting on Integrity in Sports held on 18/19 October 2011 (25 November 2011);Google Scholar
  19. INTERPOL (2013). Annual Activity Report for the INTERPOL – FIFA Initiative 2012/13 (3 July 2013);Google Scholar
  20. INTERPOL(2013). Explanatory note to Year 3 of the first 3-Year Action Plan (29 April 2013);Google Scholar
  21. INTERPOL (2013). ‘Outcome Statements’ from International Conferences in Rome (18 January 2013) and Kuala Lumpur (21 February 2013). ‘Match Fixing: The Ugly side of the beautiful game’;Google Scholar
  22. INTERPOL (2013). Programme Management Plan, INTERPOL – FIFA Initiative;Google Scholar
  23. INTERPOL (2011 and 2013). Training Needs Assessment Reports ( December 2011 and 12 June 2013);Google Scholar
  24. INTERPOL (2012, 2013). Extracts from Weekly media reports;Google Scholar
  25. INTERPOL – FIFA Agreement (2011). General Conditions governing FIFA’s contribution to the benefit of the ICPO INTERPOL within the framework of the INTERPOL – FIFA Anti-Corruption Initiative (9 May 2011);Google Scholar
  26. IRIS (Institut de relations Internationales et strategiques) (2012). Sports Betting and Corruption: How to preserve the integrity of sport;Google Scholar
  27. L’Institut de relations internationales et stratégiques. (2012). Sports betting and corruption : How to preserve the integrity of sport. Paris.Google Scholar
  28. Jennings, A. (2007). Foul! The secret world of FIFA: Bribes, vote rigging and ticket scandals. HarperSport.Google Scholar
  29. SportAccord. (2011). Model rules on sports integrity in relation on sports betting (version 2). Lausanne, Switzerland.Google Scholar
  30. Schenk, S. (2011). Safe hands: Building integrity and transparency at FIFA. Berlin: Transparency International.Google Scholar
  31. UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) (2013). Declaration of Berlin (from MINEPS V – the 5th International Conference of Ministers and Senior Officials responsible for Physical Education and Sport);UNITED KINGDOM (Department of Culture, Media and Sport) (2010). Report of the Sports Betting Integrity Panel (chairman Rick PARRY) (February 2010);Google Scholar
  32. Sports Betting Integrity Panel. (2010). Report of the Sports Betting Integrity Panel. XXXX: United Kingdom Department of Culture, Media and Sport.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.INTERPOLLyonFrance

Personalised recommendations