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Energy Problems Analysis

  • Tiziana PoliEmail author
  • Riccardo Paolini
  • Andrea Giovanni Mainini
  • Giorgio Pansa
  • Enrico De Angelis
  • Matteo Fiori
Chapter
Part of the Research for Development book series (REDE)

Abstract

The reduction of the energy demand of building stocks is a crucial issue for designers and public administrations, considering the huge effect on population in terms of health related to thermal comfort and to pollution, and in terms of energy costs. However, in common design practice just the effect of climate on buildings is considered, while designers, normally, since they are not provided with the suited tools for this, do not care about the influence of the built environment, which is proved in the literature to be huge. Herein we present the analyses of possible actions for refurbishing and reshaping the energy demand of the Walled City of Multan, focusing on three main aspects: urban scale, building scale, and solar energy exploitation. In detail, we analyzed and modeled the existing condition and possible improvements to mitigate thermal stress in urban areas. Then, we analyzed the energy demand of single buildings, modeling possible actions to improve indoor thermal comfort. Finally, we considered the possible ways to exploit the available solar energy to reduce the energy use in buildings. The aim of this study is then to assess the mitigation of outdoor heat stress conditions, within the urban environment; the thermal comfort conditions indoors; the operational energy need of buildings; and the fraction of energy that is possible to cover with renewable sources.

Keywords

Thermal Comfort Street Canyon Physiological Equivalent Temperature Anthropogenic Heat Green Spot 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tiziana Poli
    • 1
    Email author
  • Riccardo Paolini
    • 1
  • Andrea Giovanni Mainini
    • 1
  • Giorgio Pansa
    • 1
  • Enrico De Angelis
    • 1
  • Matteo Fiori
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Architecture, Built Environment and Construction EngineeringPolitecnico di MilanoMilanItaly

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