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From Shem the Son of Noah to Abraham Son of Terah

  • Arie S. IssarEmail author
Chapter
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Part of the SpringerBriefs in Geography book series (BRIEFSGEOGRAPHY)

Abstract

Ur-Kassdim the city from which Terah and later of his son Abram-Abraham immigrated to Canaan is identified with Urkesh the capital of the Hurrian kingdom in northeastern Syria. The reason for this immigration was a period of dryness, which had affected the Middle East, starting around 2300 B.C. and reaching its peak around 1800 B.C. The wave of the immigrants also conquered a few of the Canaanite city-kingdoms and turned them to fortified cities. This climatic crisis led to the invasion of Egypt by the Hyksos, who gained control over northern Egypt. The immigration to Egypt was because of its prosperity due to the fact that the sources of the Nile are in tropical and sub-tropical Africa.

Keywords

Middle East Zagros Mountain Taurus Mountain Average Annual Amount Nomad Tribe 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The J. Blaustein Institute for Desert Research, Sede-Boqer CampusBen-Gurion University of the NegevBeer-ShevaIsrael

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