A Survey of Academics’ Views of the Use of Web2.0 Technologies in Higher Education

  • Thomas Hainey
  • Thomas M. Connolly
  • Gavin J. Baxter
  • Carole Gould
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 239)

Abstract

Communication is no longer inhibited by boundaries. Communities of like minded people can form over countries and continents. Social media and collaborative technologies [Web2.0] have altered the social landscape, allowing students to collaborate, to be reflective and to participate in peer-to-peer learning. This paper presents the first empirical data gathered as part of a research study into the use of Web2.0 technologies in education. The results demonstrate that there are a number of barriers to the implementation of Web2.0 technologies, primarily lack of knowledge, lack of time and lack of institutional support. In addition, the results also demonstrate that many educators are still unsure ‘what’ Web2.0 really is and how it can be used effectively to support teaching. This correlates with the literature review carried out as part of this research.

Keywords

Empirical Web2.0 collaboration peer-to-peer learning knowledge sharing wikis blogs 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas Hainey
    • 1
  • Thomas M. Connolly
    • 1
  • Gavin J. Baxter
    • 1
  • Carole Gould
    • 1
  1. 1.School of ComputingUniversity of the West of ScotlandPaisleyScotland

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