Economic Crises and the Post-Massification of Higher Education

Chapter

Abstract

An economic crisis is the most influential environmental factor on contemporary higher education. This chapter overviews how the economic cycle affects higher education and presents some theoretical perspectives on it. An economic crisis is a short-term cycle and its impact on education is more direct than ever, and this is especially true in higher education more than other forms of education. In such a situation, the core question becomes how to survive without rapid tuition increases. This chapter looks at how to economize university expenditures, rather than generating more revenue. This chapter proposes to move from a strong research orientation to consider the balance between teaching and research.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of EducationSeoul National UniversitySeoulSouth Korea

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