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African and West-Asian Communication

  • Marieke de Mooij
Chapter

Abstract

As yet no communication theory has been developed for sub-Saharan Africa and the Arab world, but literature by African philosophers about African culture and Arab–Islamic philosophy explains communication behavior. Sub-Saharan African worldview is based on the concept of Ubuntu that includes concepts like humanity, affection, and caring. The basic drivers of communication based on African worldviews are communality, a relationship orientation, indirectness, spirituality, and music. Most of Africa has an oral history which is reflected in mediated communication styles. African communication theory has followed Western theories focusing on the effects of media. Communication in Western Asia including the Arab world can be characterized as indirect and relationship oriented. In this region eloquence is an essential element of communication. Arab culture has been characterized as highly oral, favoring conversational modes of communication over pictures and written texts. Hyperbole, metaphors, and flowery expressions are part of Arab communication style.

Keywords

Communication Behavior Interpersonal Communication Arab World African Society African Communication 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marieke de Mooij
    • 1
  1. 1.Burgh-HaamstedeThe Netherlands

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