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Experimental Tools for Responsive Hydrogel Characterization

Part of the Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series book series (CPSEMS)

Abstract

Responsive hydrogels are a class of shape memory materials that undergo a large elastic volumetric change when interacting with a stimulus and can return to their original shape. With the advent of microfluidics and subsequent ‘lab on a chip’ devices, the use of these responsive hydrogels has become more prevalent because of the ability to easily fabricate them into many various complicated geometries on the micro-scale. The mechanics of the interaction of a responsive hydrogel to its surroundings is of utmost importance in the fields of microfluidics and microelectromechanical-based devices (MEMS). This work will explore the issue of characterizing the adhesion energy of responsive hydrogels. With the use of fracture mechanics concepts, the strength of the attachment of a responsive hydrogel to various substrates can be studied.

Keywords

  • Fracture mechanics
  • Microfluidics
  • Hydrogel
  • Crack propagation
  • Swelling

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Acknowledgements

This research was supported with funds from the Graduate School (WCC), a Hilldale Undergraduate Research Scholarship (JCS), and the Graduate Engineering Research Scholars Program (CCB) from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. This material is also based on work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program (CCB) under Grant No. DGE – 1256259. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

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Benjamin, C.C., Springmann, J.C., Chindhy, S.A., Crone, W.C. (2014). Experimental Tools for Responsive Hydrogel Characterization. In: Jay, C. (eds) Fracture and Fatigue, Volume 7. Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-00765-6_2

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-00765-6_2

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  • Publisher Name: Springer, Cham

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-319-00764-9

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-319-00765-6

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