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Restroom Human Detection Using One-Dimensional Brightness Distribution Sensor

  • Shorta Nakashima
  • Shenglin Mu
  • Okabe Shintaro
  • Kanya Tanaka
  • Yuji Wakasa
  • Yuhki Kitazono
  • Seiichi Serikawa
Part of the Studies in Computational Intelligence book series (SCI, volume 492)

Abstract

As aging society problem goes serious; systems to confirm safety of elders in daily life are expected. In this paper, a sensor, which detects person localization without privacy offending, applying brightness distribution is realized. In the proposed design, the sensor is constructed with a line sensor and cylindrical lens to obtain one-dimensional brightness distribution. Comparing with conventional line sensors, CMOS area sensors are with low cost, and high sensitivity. Therefore, in the proposed sensor, the CMOS area sensor is applied as covered in certain areas physically, so that it behaves as a line sensor. The proposed sensor is able to obtain one-dimensional horizontal brightness distribution that is approximately equal to integration value of each vertical pixel line of two-dimensional image. By employing this method, the information of the target person’s position and movement status can be obtained without using two-dimensional detail texture image.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shorta Nakashima
    • 1
  • Shenglin Mu
    • 2
  • Okabe Shintaro
    • 1
  • Kanya Tanaka
    • 1
  • Yuji Wakasa
    • 1
  • Yuhki Kitazono
    • 3
  • Seiichi Serikawa
    • 4
  1. 1.Yamaguchi UniversityUbeJapan
  2. 2.Hiroshima National College of Maritime TechnologyToyota-kunJapan
  3. 3.Kitakyushu National College of TechnologyKitakyushuJapan
  4. 4.Kyushu Institute of TechnologyKitakyushuJapan

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