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Vastu Geometry: Beyond Building Codes

  • Vini Nathan
Chapter

Abstract

Despite their regional flourishes, Hindu temple designs displayed a remarkable unity of aesthetic purposes. This unified philosophy was codified into a system of rules or canons (a compendium of architectural guidelines) called the Vastushastras. One of the most important of these canons from ancient times to the present day is the Vastu purusha mandala, a collection of rules which attempt to facilitate the translation of theological concepts into architectural form. This law of proportions and rhythmic ordering of elements not only found full expression in temples, but extended to residential and urban planning as well. This paper discusses the principles underlying the Vastu purusha mandala, the application of the Vastu purusha mandala in residential design and city planning; and the implications of the mandalas on the social milieu are also identified. Finally, the current status of the mandala in contemporary Indian architecture and urban design are identified.

Keywords

Ground Plan City Planning High Caste Lower Caste Closed Polygon 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.College of Architecture, Design and ConstructionAuburn UniversityAuburnUSA

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